Hybrid resistance

'Negative' and 'positive' signaling of murine natural killer cells

Michael Bennett, Y. Y Lawrence Yu, Earl Stoneman, Richard M. Rembecki, Porunelloor A. Mathew, Kirsten Fischer Lindahl, Vinay Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Murine NK cells can reject allogenic or parental-strain bone marrow cells (BMC) in vivo and can lyse T lymphobasts in vitro. The 'missing self' hypothesis states that absence or presence of 'negative signals' from target cell class I antigens (Ag) to NK receptors determines whether or not lysis occurs. Indeed, lysis of parental-strain basts by purified F1 NK cell subsets occurred only in the presence of anti-receptor antibodies. Evidence for 'positive signaling' to NK cells by class I Ag indudes rejection of D8 (Dd) transgene to B6) BMC by B6 hosts. The outcome of other BMC transplants ccntradict the missing self idea, because donors with identical class I Ag differ in compatibility with certain hosts. Perhaps class I Ag-NK cell receptor interactions dominate over other target-NK cell interactions. These interactions are usually 'negative' but can be 'positive'.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-127
Number of pages7
JournalSeminars in Immunology
Volume7
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1995

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Histocompatibility Antigens Class I
Natural Killer Cells
Bone Marrow Cells
Cell Communication
Natural Killer Cell Receptors
Transgenes
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Transplants

Keywords

  • Class I molecules
  • Lysis of lymphoblasts
  • Marrow grafts
  • NK receptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Bennett, M., Yu, Y. Y. L., Stoneman, E., Rembecki, R. M., Mathew, P. A., Lindahl, K. F., & Kumar, V. (1995). Hybrid resistance: 'Negative' and 'positive' signaling of murine natural killer cells. Seminars in Immunology, 7(2), 121-127.

Hybrid resistance : 'Negative' and 'positive' signaling of murine natural killer cells. / Bennett, Michael; Yu, Y. Y Lawrence; Stoneman, Earl; Rembecki, Richard M.; Mathew, Porunelloor A.; Lindahl, Kirsten Fischer; Kumar, Vinay.

In: Seminars in Immunology, Vol. 7, No. 2, 1995, p. 121-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bennett, M, Yu, YYL, Stoneman, E, Rembecki, RM, Mathew, PA, Lindahl, KF & Kumar, V 1995, 'Hybrid resistance: 'Negative' and 'positive' signaling of murine natural killer cells', Seminars in Immunology, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 121-127.
Bennett M, Yu YYL, Stoneman E, Rembecki RM, Mathew PA, Lindahl KF et al. Hybrid resistance: 'Negative' and 'positive' signaling of murine natural killer cells. Seminars in Immunology. 1995;7(2):121-127.
Bennett, Michael ; Yu, Y. Y Lawrence ; Stoneman, Earl ; Rembecki, Richard M. ; Mathew, Porunelloor A. ; Lindahl, Kirsten Fischer ; Kumar, Vinay. / Hybrid resistance : 'Negative' and 'positive' signaling of murine natural killer cells. In: Seminars in Immunology. 1995 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 121-127.
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