Hyperglucagonemia and its suppression. Importance in the metabolic control of diabetes

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Abstract

The role of glucagon in diabetes was studied in four patients with juvenile-type diabetes during continuous insulin infusion and a diet containing 150 g per day of carbohydrate. During insulin alone, plasma glucagon, measured at two-hour intervals, averaged 182 ± 34 pg per millimeter, glucose 269 ± 11 mg per deciliter, glucose excretion 52±8 g per 24 hours, ketone excretion 1.3 ± 0.3 mmol per 24 hours and urea nitrogen 12 ± 2 g per 24 hours (man ± S.E.M.). Somatostatin (2 mg per day) lowered glucagon to 60 ± 13 pg per millimeter, glucose to 111 ± 17 mg per deciliter, glucose exretion to 1 ± 0.7 g per 24 hours, ketone exretion to 0.5 ± 0.2 mmol per 24 hours and urea nitrogen excretion to 8 ± 2 per 24 hours. Replacement of glucagon raised glucagon to 272 ± 30 pg per milliliter, glucose to 202 ± 20 mg per deciliter, glucose excretion to 14 ± 7 g per 24 hours, ketone excretion to 0.8 mmol per 24 hours and urea nitrogen excretion to 11 ± 2 g per 24 hours. In a subsequent study, similar improvement occurred on a diet of 30 g of carbohydrate daily, when absorption of dietary glucose was negligible. Hyperglucagonemia has an important role in diabetes; its correction reduces diabetic abnormalities to or toward normal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-436
Number of pages4
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume299
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1978

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Glucagon
Glucose
Ketones
Urea
Nitrogen
Carbohydrates
Insulin
Diet
Somatostatin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "The role of glucagon in diabetes was studied in four patients with juvenile-type diabetes during continuous insulin infusion and a diet containing 150 g per day of carbohydrate. During insulin alone, plasma glucagon, measured at two-hour intervals, averaged 182 ± 34 pg per millimeter, glucose 269 ± 11 mg per deciliter, glucose excretion 52±8 g per 24 hours, ketone excretion 1.3 ± 0.3 mmol per 24 hours and urea nitrogen 12 ± 2 g per 24 hours (man ± S.E.M.). Somatostatin (2 mg per day) lowered glucagon to 60 ± 13 pg per millimeter, glucose to 111 ± 17 mg per deciliter, glucose exretion to 1 ± 0.7 g per 24 hours, ketone exretion to 0.5 ± 0.2 mmol per 24 hours and urea nitrogen excretion to 8 ± 2 per 24 hours. Replacement of glucagon raised glucagon to 272 ± 30 pg per milliliter, glucose to 202 ± 20 mg per deciliter, glucose excretion to 14 ± 7 g per 24 hours, ketone excretion to 0.8 mmol per 24 hours and urea nitrogen excretion to 11 ± 2 g per 24 hours. In a subsequent study, similar improvement occurred on a diet of 30 g of carbohydrate daily, when absorption of dietary glucose was negligible. Hyperglucagonemia has an important role in diabetes; its correction reduces diabetic abnormalities to or toward normal.",
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