Hyphema caused by a metallic intraocular foreign body during magnetic resonance imaging

Christopher N. Ta, Robert W Bowman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To report a 63-year-old man with a retained intraocular foreign body who developed a hyphema during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. METHODS: Case report and review of the current literature on ocular injury caused by intraocular foreign bodies when subjected to an electromagnetic field. RESULTS: Our patient underwent a brain MRI, and the intraocular foreign body caused a hyphema and increased intraocular pressure. The presence and location of the intraocular foreign body were determined by computed tomography (CT). CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging can cause serious ocular injury in patients with ferromagnetic intraocular foreign bodies. This case demonstrates the importance of obtaining an occupational history, and, when indicated, a skull x-ray or CT to rule out intraocular foreign body before an MRI study. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-534
Number of pages2
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume129
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2000

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Hyphema
Foreign Bodies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Eye Injuries
Tomography
Electromagnetic Fields
Brain
Intraocular Pressure
Skull
X-Rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Hyphema caused by a metallic intraocular foreign body during magnetic resonance imaging. / Ta, Christopher N.; Bowman, Robert W.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 129, No. 4, 04.2000, p. 533-534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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