Hypothalamic pathways linking energy balance and reproduction

Jennifer W. Hill, Joel K. Elmquist, Carol F. Elias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

245 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During periods of metabolic stress, animals must channel energy toward survival and away from processes such as reproduction. The reproductive axis, therefore, has the capacity to respond to changing levels of metabolic cues. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that link energy balance and reproduction, as well as the brain sites mediating this function, are still not well understood. This review focuses on the best characterized of the adiposity signals: leptin and insulin. We examine their reproductive role acting on the classic metabolic pathways of the arcuate nucleus, NPY/AgRP and POMC/CART neurons, and the newly identified kisspeptin network. In addition, other hypothalamic nuclei that may play a role in linking metabolic state and reproductive function are discussed. The nature of the interplay between these elements of the metabolic and reproductive systems presents a fascinating puzzle, whose pieces are just beginning to fall into place.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume294
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Energy balance
Reproduction
Kisspeptins
Pro-Opiomelanocortin
Arcuate Nucleus of Hypothalamus
Physiological Stress
Adiposity
Leptin
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Neurons
Cues
Brain
Animals
Insulin

Keywords

  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone
  • Insulin
  • Kisspeptin
  • Leptin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Hypothalamic pathways linking energy balance and reproduction. / Hill, Jennifer W.; Elmquist, Joel K.; Elias, Carol F.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 294, No. 5, 05.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0c1b3a8cc3a243cf9910278312da16b0,
title = "Hypothalamic pathways linking energy balance and reproduction",
abstract = "During periods of metabolic stress, animals must channel energy toward survival and away from processes such as reproduction. The reproductive axis, therefore, has the capacity to respond to changing levels of metabolic cues. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that link energy balance and reproduction, as well as the brain sites mediating this function, are still not well understood. This review focuses on the best characterized of the adiposity signals: leptin and insulin. We examine their reproductive role acting on the classic metabolic pathways of the arcuate nucleus, NPY/AgRP and POMC/CART neurons, and the newly identified kisspeptin network. In addition, other hypothalamic nuclei that may play a role in linking metabolic state and reproductive function are discussed. The nature of the interplay between these elements of the metabolic and reproductive systems presents a fascinating puzzle, whose pieces are just beginning to fall into place.",
keywords = "Gonadotropin-releasing hormone, Insulin, Kisspeptin, Leptin",
author = "Hill, {Jennifer W.} and Elmquist, {Joel K.} and Elias, {Carol F.}",
year = "2008",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1152/ajpendo.00670.2007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "294",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology",
issn = "0363-6135",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hypothalamic pathways linking energy balance and reproduction

AU - Hill, Jennifer W.

AU - Elmquist, Joel K.

AU - Elias, Carol F.

PY - 2008/5

Y1 - 2008/5

N2 - During periods of metabolic stress, animals must channel energy toward survival and away from processes such as reproduction. The reproductive axis, therefore, has the capacity to respond to changing levels of metabolic cues. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that link energy balance and reproduction, as well as the brain sites mediating this function, are still not well understood. This review focuses on the best characterized of the adiposity signals: leptin and insulin. We examine their reproductive role acting on the classic metabolic pathways of the arcuate nucleus, NPY/AgRP and POMC/CART neurons, and the newly identified kisspeptin network. In addition, other hypothalamic nuclei that may play a role in linking metabolic state and reproductive function are discussed. The nature of the interplay between these elements of the metabolic and reproductive systems presents a fascinating puzzle, whose pieces are just beginning to fall into place.

AB - During periods of metabolic stress, animals must channel energy toward survival and away from processes such as reproduction. The reproductive axis, therefore, has the capacity to respond to changing levels of metabolic cues. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that link energy balance and reproduction, as well as the brain sites mediating this function, are still not well understood. This review focuses on the best characterized of the adiposity signals: leptin and insulin. We examine their reproductive role acting on the classic metabolic pathways of the arcuate nucleus, NPY/AgRP and POMC/CART neurons, and the newly identified kisspeptin network. In addition, other hypothalamic nuclei that may play a role in linking metabolic state and reproductive function are discussed. The nature of the interplay between these elements of the metabolic and reproductive systems presents a fascinating puzzle, whose pieces are just beginning to fall into place.

KW - Gonadotropin-releasing hormone

KW - Insulin

KW - Kisspeptin

KW - Leptin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=45549104270&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=45549104270&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1152/ajpendo.00670.2007

DO - 10.1152/ajpendo.00670.2007

M3 - Article

VL - 294

JO - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

SN - 0363-6135

IS - 5

ER -