Identification and characterization of X-ray-induced proteins in human cells

D. A. Boothman, I. Bouvard, E. N. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In order to investigate the biochemical events involved in potentially lethal DNA damage repair (PLDR), we have identified a pleiotropic protein expression response that is activated upon X-irradiation of confluence-arrested human malignant melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. Plateau-phase U1-Mel cells were selected because of their extraordinary capacity for PLDR. Eight major X-ray-induced polypeptides (XIPs) of M(r) 126,000-275,000 (i.e., XIP126 through XIP275) were detected by resolving L-[35S]methionine-labeled whole cell extracts using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. XIPs were found in unirradiated, proliferating U1-Mel cells, shut off under plateau-phase conditions and resynthesized in response to X-irradiation. The expression of three classes of proteins was affected by X-irradiation. Class I proteins, XIP145 and XIP269, were induced linearly with increasing X-ray doses. The rate of synthesis of class II proteins, XIP126, XIP135, XIP138, XIP141, XIP147, and XIP275, increased linearly with low X-irradiation doses, but plateaued at doses of 150-250 cGy. In contrast, the expression of class III proteins, 47,000 and 254,000 M(r) proteins, decreased with increasing X-ray doses. Tumor, cancer-prone, and normal human cells, which represent a wide range of cells with varied repair capacities, were investigated to better understand the role of XIPs in DNA damage responses. X-irradiated normal and tumor cells induced the synthesis of XIP145 and XIP269. A strong correlation between the induction of XIP269 and PLDR capacity, as measured by delayed plating of plateau-phase cells, was noted. XIP269 was present in six of seven normal and tumor cell types, but was completely absent in cells from patients with Bloom's syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia. X-irradiated Fanconi's anemia and xeroderma pigmentosum cells synthesized lower levels of XIP269. The majority of XIPs synthesized by X-irradiated cells from cancer-prone patients were of low molecular weights. A number of XIP expression characteristics suggest their role in either gross chromosomal PLDR and/or in X-ray adaptivity responses: (a) XIP expression was inhibited by 1 μg/ml cycloheximide, a dose which decreased survival 6-fold during PLDR holding and resulted in >80% inhibition of protein synthesis; (b) XIP expression was specific for ionizing radiation damage, since heat shock, hypoxia, and alkylating agents failed to induce their synthesis; (c) the time course of expression was long with the first appearance of XIPs at 3 h and maximal expression at 4 h.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2871-2878
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Research
Volume49
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

X-Rays
DNA Damage
Peptides
DNA Repair
Proteins
Neoplasms
Bloom Syndrome
Fanconi Anemia
Xeroderma Pigmentosum
Ataxia Telangiectasia
Alkylating Agents
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Cycloheximide
Ionizing Radiation
Cell Extracts
Methionine
Melanoma
Shock
Hot Temperature
Molecular Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Boothman, D. A., Bouvard, I., & Hughes, E. N. (1989). Identification and characterization of X-ray-induced proteins in human cells. Cancer Research, 49(11), 2871-2878.

Identification and characterization of X-ray-induced proteins in human cells. / Boothman, D. A.; Bouvard, I.; Hughes, E. N.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 49, No. 11, 1989, p. 2871-2878.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boothman, DA, Bouvard, I & Hughes, EN 1989, 'Identification and characterization of X-ray-induced proteins in human cells', Cancer Research, vol. 49, no. 11, pp. 2871-2878.
Boothman DA, Bouvard I, Hughes EN. Identification and characterization of X-ray-induced proteins in human cells. Cancer Research. 1989;49(11):2871-2878.
Boothman, D. A. ; Bouvard, I. ; Hughes, E. N. / Identification and characterization of X-ray-induced proteins in human cells. In: Cancer Research. 1989 ; Vol. 49, No. 11. pp. 2871-2878.
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N2 - In order to investigate the biochemical events involved in potentially lethal DNA damage repair (PLDR), we have identified a pleiotropic protein expression response that is activated upon X-irradiation of confluence-arrested human malignant melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. Plateau-phase U1-Mel cells were selected because of their extraordinary capacity for PLDR. Eight major X-ray-induced polypeptides (XIPs) of M(r) 126,000-275,000 (i.e., XIP126 through XIP275) were detected by resolving L-[35S]methionine-labeled whole cell extracts using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. XIPs were found in unirradiated, proliferating U1-Mel cells, shut off under plateau-phase conditions and resynthesized in response to X-irradiation. The expression of three classes of proteins was affected by X-irradiation. Class I proteins, XIP145 and XIP269, were induced linearly with increasing X-ray doses. The rate of synthesis of class II proteins, XIP126, XIP135, XIP138, XIP141, XIP147, and XIP275, increased linearly with low X-irradiation doses, but plateaued at doses of 150-250 cGy. In contrast, the expression of class III proteins, 47,000 and 254,000 M(r) proteins, decreased with increasing X-ray doses. Tumor, cancer-prone, and normal human cells, which represent a wide range of cells with varied repair capacities, were investigated to better understand the role of XIPs in DNA damage responses. X-irradiated normal and tumor cells induced the synthesis of XIP145 and XIP269. A strong correlation between the induction of XIP269 and PLDR capacity, as measured by delayed plating of plateau-phase cells, was noted. XIP269 was present in six of seven normal and tumor cell types, but was completely absent in cells from patients with Bloom's syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia. X-irradiated Fanconi's anemia and xeroderma pigmentosum cells synthesized lower levels of XIP269. The majority of XIPs synthesized by X-irradiated cells from cancer-prone patients were of low molecular weights. A number of XIP expression characteristics suggest their role in either gross chromosomal PLDR and/or in X-ray adaptivity responses: (a) XIP expression was inhibited by 1 μg/ml cycloheximide, a dose which decreased survival 6-fold during PLDR holding and resulted in >80% inhibition of protein synthesis; (b) XIP expression was specific for ionizing radiation damage, since heat shock, hypoxia, and alkylating agents failed to induce their synthesis; (c) the time course of expression was long with the first appearance of XIPs at 3 h and maximal expression at 4 h.

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