Identification of an outer membrane lipoprotein involved in nasopharyngeal colonization by Moraxella catarrhalis in an animal model

Wei Wang, Stephanie N. Joslin, Christine Pybus, Amanda S Evans, Flora Lichaa, Chad A Brautigam, Eric J Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Colonization of the human nasopharynx by Moraxella catarrhalis is presumed to involve attachment of this bacterium to the mucosa. DNA microarray analysis was used to determine whether attachment of M. catarrhalis to human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells in vitro affected gene expression in this bacterium. Attachment affected expression of at least 454 different genes, with 163 being upregulated and 291 being downregulated. Among the upregulated genes was one (ORF113) previously annotated as encoding a protein with some similarity to outer membrane protein A (OmpA). The protein encoded by ORF113 was predicted to have a signal peptidase II cleavage site, and globomycin inhibition experiments confirmed that this protein was indeed a lipoprotein. The ORF113 protein also contained a predicted peptidoglycan-binding domain in its C-terminal half. The use of mutant and recombinant M. catarrhalis strains confirmed that the ORF113 protein was present in outer membrane preparations, and this protein was also shown to be at least partially exposed on the bacterial cell surface. A mutant unable to produce the ORF113 protein showed little or no change in its growth rate in vitro, in its ability to attach to HBE cells in vitro, or in its autoagglutination characteristics, but it did exhibit a reduced ability to survive in the chinchilla nasopharynx. This is the first report of a lipoprotein essential to the ability of M. catarrhalis to persist in an animal model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2287-2299
Number of pages13
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume82
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis
Lipoproteins
Animal Models
Membranes
Proteins
Nasopharynx
Epithelial Cells
Chinchilla
Bacteria
Peptidoglycan
Microarray Analysis
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Genes
Membrane Proteins
Mucous Membrane
Down-Regulation
Gene Expression
Growth
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology
  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Identification of an outer membrane lipoprotein involved in nasopharyngeal colonization by Moraxella catarrhalis in an animal model. / Wang, Wei; Joslin, Stephanie N.; Pybus, Christine; Evans, Amanda S; Lichaa, Flora; Brautigam, Chad A; Hansen, Eric J.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 82, No. 6, 2014, p. 2287-2299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Wei ; Joslin, Stephanie N. ; Pybus, Christine ; Evans, Amanda S ; Lichaa, Flora ; Brautigam, Chad A ; Hansen, Eric J. / Identification of an outer membrane lipoprotein involved in nasopharyngeal colonization by Moraxella catarrhalis in an animal model. In: Infection and Immunity. 2014 ; Vol. 82, No. 6. pp. 2287-2299.
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