Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

Beyond consensus

Desiree Medeiros, George R. Buchanan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is the most common acquired bleeding disorder encountered by pediatricians. Most children with ITP have minimal bleeding and complete platelet count recovery within weeks to months. Therapy for ITP has ranged from close observation without medical intervention to aggressive management with corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin G, or anti-D immune globulin. The topic of ITP has incited great debate among practitioners, and this debate prompted the development of ITP practice guidelines by the British Paediatric Haematology Group in 1992 and by the American Society of Hematology in 1996. A better understanding of the clinical course of, risk for significant bleeding in, and optimal evaluation and therapy of childhood ITP will require carefully designed, multicenter, clinical trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-9
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pediatrics
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura
Hemorrhage
Intravenous Immunoglobulins
Hematology
Platelet Count
Practice Guidelines
Multicenter Studies
Immunoglobulins
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Immunoglobulin G
Observation
Clinical Trials
Pediatrics
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura : Beyond consensus. / Medeiros, Desiree; Buchanan, George R.

In: Current Opinion in Pediatrics, Vol. 12, No. 1, 2000, p. 4-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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