IgE-mediated regulation of IL-10 and type I interferon enhances rhinovirus-induced Th2 priming by primary human monocytes

Regina K. Rowe, David M. Pyle, J. David Farrar, Michelle A. Gill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Rhinovirus infections are linked to the development and exacerbation of allergic diseases including allergic asthma. IgE, another contributor to atopic disease pathogenesis, has been shown to regulate dendritic cell antiviral functions and influence T cell priming by monocytes. We previously demonstrated that IgE-mediated stimulation of monocytes alters multiple cellular functions including cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, and influenza-induced Th1 priming. In this study, we investigate the effects of IgE-mediated allergic stimulation on monocyte-driven, RV-induced T cell priming utilizing primary human monocyte-T cell co-cultures. We demonstrate that IgE crosslinking of RV-exposed monocytes enhances monocyte-driven Th2 priming. This increase in RV-induced Th2 differentiation was regulated by IgE-mediated inhibition of type I interferon and induction of IL-10. These findings suggest an additional mechanism by which two clinically significant risk factors for allergic disease exacerbations - IgE-mediated stimulation and rhinovirus infection, may synergistically promote Th2 differentiation and allergic inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUnknown Journal
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 8 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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