Ileocecal valve lipoma with refractory hemorrhage

Linda A. Dultz, Brant W. Ullery, Huan Huan Sun, Tara L. Huston, Soumitra R. Eachempati, Philip S. Barie, Jian Shou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Lipomas are the most common benign mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, with the colon being the most prevalent site. Intestinal lipomas are usually asymptomatic. Tumors >2 cm in diameter may occasionally cause nonspecific symptoms, including change in bowel habits, abdominal pain, or rectal bleeding, but with resection the prognosis is excellent. Herein, we describe the case of an elderly male who presented with painless hematochezia. Methods: Both colonoscopy and computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis confirmed the presence of a mass near the ileocecal valve. Because of continuing bleeding, the patient required laparoscopic-assisted right hemicolectomy to resect the mass. Results: Both gross and microscopic pathology were consistent with lipoma at the ileocecal valve. Conclusion: Previous cases of ileocecal valve lipomas have been reported in the English literature, with the majority presenting as intussusception or volvulus. We present a rare case of an ulcerated ileocecal valve lipoma presenting as lower gastrointestinal bleeding that was treated successfully with laparoscopic resection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-83
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons
Volume13
Issue number1
StatePublished - Nov 2 2009

Fingerprint

Ileocecal Valve
Lipoma
Hemorrhage
Literature
Intestinal Volvulus
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage
Intussusception
Colonoscopy
Pelvis
Abdomen
Abdominal Pain
Habits
Gastrointestinal Tract
Neoplasms
Colon
Tomography
Pathology

Keywords

  • Ileocecal valve
  • Lipoma
  • Rectal bleeding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Dultz, L. A., Ullery, B. W., Sun, H. H., Huston, T. L., Eachempati, S. R., Barie, P. S., & Shou, J. (2009). Ileocecal valve lipoma with refractory hemorrhage. Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, 13(1), 80-83.

Ileocecal valve lipoma with refractory hemorrhage. / Dultz, Linda A.; Ullery, Brant W.; Sun, Huan Huan; Huston, Tara L.; Eachempati, Soumitra R.; Barie, Philip S.; Shou, Jian.

In: Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, Vol. 13, No. 1, 02.11.2009, p. 80-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dultz, LA, Ullery, BW, Sun, HH, Huston, TL, Eachempati, SR, Barie, PS & Shou, J 2009, 'Ileocecal valve lipoma with refractory hemorrhage', Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 80-83.
Dultz LA, Ullery BW, Sun HH, Huston TL, Eachempati SR, Barie PS et al. Ileocecal valve lipoma with refractory hemorrhage. Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons. 2009 Nov 2;13(1):80-83.
Dultz, Linda A. ; Ullery, Brant W. ; Sun, Huan Huan ; Huston, Tara L. ; Eachempati, Soumitra R. ; Barie, Philip S. ; Shou, Jian. / Ileocecal valve lipoma with refractory hemorrhage. In: Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons. 2009 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 80-83.
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