Illness risk perceptions and trust: The association with blood pressure self-measurement

Patrice A C Vaeth, Du Wayne L Willett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the prevalence of blood pressure selfmeasurement among those with hypertension and examine how this behavior may be associated with illness perceptions, risk perceptions, and attitudes about care. Methods: Cross-sectional data from a population-based study of cardiovascular disease (n=656). Results: The prevalence of self-measurement was 26.2%. Both above- and below-average perceived risks of stroke were associated with a decreased likelihood of self-monitoring (OR=0.36, 95% CI=0.14-0.91; and OR=0.16, 95% CI=0.05-0.75 respectively). Completely trusting the medical system was associated with a decreased likelihood of self-monitoring (OR=0.47, 95% CI=0.22-0.99). Conclusion: Selfmonitoring can be influenced by illness risk perception and patient- physician trust.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-117
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume35
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2011

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illness
Blood Pressure
monitoring
hypertension
stroke
Cardiovascular Diseases
Stroke
physician
Hypertension
Disease
Physicians
Population

Keywords

  • Home blood pressure monitoring.
  • Hypertension.
  • Illness perceptions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Illness risk perceptions and trust : The association with blood pressure self-measurement. / Vaeth, Patrice A C; Willett, Du Wayne L.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 35, No. 1, 2011, p. 105-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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