Illness risk perceptions and trust: The association with blood pressure self-measurement

Patrice A C Vaeth, Du Wayne L Willett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the prevalence of blood pressure selfmeasurement among those with hypertension and examine how this behavior may be associated with illness perceptions, risk perceptions, and attitudes about care. Methods: Cross-sectional data from a population-based study of cardiovascular disease (n=656). Results: The prevalence of self-measurement was 26.2%. Both above- and below-average perceived risks of stroke were associated with a decreased likelihood of self-monitoring (OR=0.36, 95% CI=0.14-0.91; and OR=0.16, 95% CI=0.05-0.75 respectively). Completely trusting the medical system was associated with a decreased likelihood of self-monitoring (OR=0.47, 95% CI=0.22-0.99). Conclusion: Selfmonitoring can be influenced by illness risk perception and patient- physician trust.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-117
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Keywords

  • Home blood pressure monitoring.
  • Hypertension.
  • Illness perceptions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Illness risk perceptions and trust: The association with blood pressure self-measurement'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this