Imaging Evaluation of Lower Extremity Infrainguinal Disease: Role of the Noninvasive Vascular Laboratory, Computed Tomography Angiography, and Magnetic Resonance Angiography

Danny Chan, Matthew E. Anderson, Bart L. Dolmatch

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that commonly affects the lower extremities. The diagnosis of PAD and the subsequent treatment decisions rely on clinical exam and non-invasive imaging. The imaging modalities that aid in both diagnosis and treatment are the non-invasive vascular laboratory, computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Each modality has its own advantages and limitations. Non-invasive vascular laboratory testing can be used as a good screening tool for PAD and is often used in conjunction with an additional imaging modality if necessary. CTA and MRA have similar advantages when compared to the "gold standard" of digital subtraction angiography. CTA utilizes ionizing radiation, however is readily available and cheaper when compared to MRA. CTA is attractive due to its 3-D reconstruction and multiplanar ability, but CTA can be limited in the presence of calcification. MRA also is attractive for its 3-D multiplanar imaging. It is important for a clinician to be familiar with the principles and technical aspects of each modality as it relates to lower extremity infrainguinal disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-22
Number of pages12
JournalTechniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Keywords

  • computed tomography angiography
  • magnetic resonance angiography
  • noninvasive vascular laboratory
  • peripheral arterial disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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