Imaging techniques for diagnosis of infective endocarditis

Molly Sachdev, Gail E. Peterson, James G. Jollis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the ability to structurally characterize cardiac manifestations, echocardiography is used for the diagnosis and management of infective endocarditis. In establishing the diagnosis according to the Duke criteria, the findings of endocardial involvement (vegetation, abscess, prosthetic valve dehiscence) or new valvular regurgitation represent "major" diagnostic criteria. As echocardiography cannot reliably differentiate noninfective from infective lesions, however, proper diagnosis lies in correlating echocardiography with clinical findings. The more invasive transesophageal approach provides substantially greater image resolution; this approach should be considered first in the evaluation of patients with higher prior probabilities of endocarditis and those with potential endocardial complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-337
Number of pages19
JournalInfectious Disease Clinics of North America
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Endocarditis
Echocardiography
Abscess

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Imaging techniques for diagnosis of infective endocarditis. / Sachdev, Molly; Peterson, Gail E.; Jollis, James G.

In: Infectious Disease Clinics of North America, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2002, p. 319-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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