Immunological and infectious risk factors for lung cancer in US veterans with HIV

a longitudinal cohort study

Keith Sigel, Juan Wisnivesky, Kristina Crothers, Kirsha Gordon, Sheldon T. Brown, David Rimland, Maria C. Rodriguez-Barradas, Cynthia Gibert, Matthew Bidwell Goetz, Roger Bedimo, Lesley S. Park, Robert Dubrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background HIV infection is independently associated with risk of lung cancer, but few data exist for the relation between longitudinal measurements of immune function and lung-cancer risk in people living with HIV. Methods We followed up participants with HIV from the Veterans Aging Cohort Study for a minimum of 3 years between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2012, and used cancer registry data to identify incident cases of lung cancer. The index date for each patient was the later of the date HIV care began or Jan 1, 1998. We excluded patients with less than 3 years' follow-up, prevalent diagnoses of lung cancer, or incomplete laboratory data. We used Cox regression models to investigate the relation between different time-updated lagged and cumulative exposures (CD4 cell count, CD8 cell count, CD4/CD8 ratio, HIV RNA, and bacterial pneumonia) and risk of lung cancer. Models were adjusted for age, race or ethnicity, smoking, hepatitis C virus infection, alcohol use disorders, drug use disorders, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and occupational lung disease. Findings We identified 277 cases of incident lung cancer in 21 666 participants with HIV. In separate models for each time-updated 12 month lagged, 24 month simple moving average cumulative exposure, increased risk of lung cancer was associated with low CD4 cell count (p trend=0·001), low CD4/CD8 ratio (p trend=0·0001), high HIV RNA concentration (p=0·004), and more cumulative bacterial pneumonia episodes (12 month lag only; p trend=0·0004). In a mutually adjusted model including these factors, CD4/CD8 ratio and cumulative bacterial pneumonia episodes remained significant (p trends 0·003 and 0·004, respectively). Interpretation In our large HIV cohort in the antiretroviral therapy era, we found evidence that dysfunctional immune activation and chronic inflammation contribute to the development of lung cancer in the setting of HIV infection. These findings could be used to target lung-cancer prevention measures to high-risk groups. Funding US National Institutes of Health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e67-e73
JournalThe Lancet HIV
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Veterans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms
Cohort Studies
HIV
Bacterial Pneumonia
CD4-CD8 Ratio
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
HIV Infections
RNA
Occupational Diseases
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Virus Diseases
Proportional Hazards Models
Hepacivirus
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Lung Diseases
Substance-Related Disorders
Registries
Cell Count

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Sigel, K., Wisnivesky, J., Crothers, K., Gordon, K., Brown, S. T., Rimland, D., ... Dubrow, R. (2017). Immunological and infectious risk factors for lung cancer in US veterans with HIV: a longitudinal cohort study. The Lancet HIV, 4(2), e67-e73. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30215-6

Immunological and infectious risk factors for lung cancer in US veterans with HIV : a longitudinal cohort study. / Sigel, Keith; Wisnivesky, Juan; Crothers, Kristina; Gordon, Kirsha; Brown, Sheldon T.; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Gibert, Cynthia; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Bedimo, Roger; Park, Lesley S.; Dubrow, Robert.

In: The Lancet HIV, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. e67-e73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sigel, K, Wisnivesky, J, Crothers, K, Gordon, K, Brown, ST, Rimland, D, Rodriguez-Barradas, MC, Gibert, C, Goetz, MB, Bedimo, R, Park, LS & Dubrow, R 2017, 'Immunological and infectious risk factors for lung cancer in US veterans with HIV: a longitudinal cohort study', The Lancet HIV, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. e67-e73. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2352-3018(16)30215-6
Sigel, Keith ; Wisnivesky, Juan ; Crothers, Kristina ; Gordon, Kirsha ; Brown, Sheldon T. ; Rimland, David ; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C. ; Gibert, Cynthia ; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell ; Bedimo, Roger ; Park, Lesley S. ; Dubrow, Robert. / Immunological and infectious risk factors for lung cancer in US veterans with HIV : a longitudinal cohort study. In: The Lancet HIV. 2017 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. e67-e73.
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