Immunomodulation following chemotherapy

M. Obadina, U. Verma, M. Hawkins, A. Mazumder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the last decade, immunomodulation has emerged as a mode of therapy capable of mediating the regression of cancer in some patients. This article reviews our experience with immunomodulation following transplant and non-transplant chemotherapy. We used interferon and cyclosporine A following conventional chemotherapy in a non-transplant setting for a B16 melanoma in a murine model. This combination generated cells with MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity. We have also used immunotherapy in the transplant setting with IL-2 activated PBSC in patients with breast cancer. Of the 28 patients treated, 20 developed GVHD and the average time to reconstitution was 12 days (comparable to a control group). This article also raises the possibility of extending immunomodulation to breast cancer patients in the non-transplant setting to induce an antitumor immune response following cytoreductive chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-48
Number of pages8
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2 1996

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Immunomodulation
Drug Therapy
Breast Neoplasms
Transplants
Experimental Melanomas
Immunotherapy
Interferons
Cyclosporine
Interleukin-2
Control Groups
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Bone marrow transplant
  • Chemotherapy
  • Graft versus host disease
  • Graft versus leukemia effect
  • Immunotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Immunomodulation following chemotherapy. / Obadina, M.; Verma, U.; Hawkins, M.; Mazumder, A.

In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Vol. 38, No. 1, 02.02.1996, p. 41-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Obadina, M. ; Verma, U. ; Hawkins, M. ; Mazumder, A. / Immunomodulation following chemotherapy. In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. 1996 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 41-48.
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