Impact of a pharmacy-led pain management team on adults in an Academic Medical Center

Stacy Mathew, Carol Chamberlain, Kristin S. Alvarez, Carlos A. Alvarez, Monal Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Pain is a major health problem affecting more than 15% of adults in the United States. In a multidisciplinary pain management team, pharmacists can optimize pharmacotherapy quality by ensuring safe and appropriate medication use. Objective: Assess the impact of a pharmacy pain medication management service on pain-related outcomes in an adult inpatient population. Methods: This retrospective study evaluated patients who were admitted from November 2009 through November 2011 and received a pharmacy pain consult. Patients were excluded if they left against medical advice, their care was assumed by palliative care, or they had no complaint of pain when seen by the pharmacist. The primary outcome was the difference between each patient's average pain score from pre-consult to post-consult. Secondary outcomes were difference between each patient's average pain score from pre-consult to pre-discharge, overall functional improvement, pharmacist interventions, and 14-day and 30-day readmissions. Results: One hundred patients were included in the final analysis. Eight hundred twenty-one interventions were made by the clinical pharmacists. Patients displayed a significant reduction in their pre- and post-consult pain intensity scores on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale (6.15 vs 3.25; p < .001). Likewise, a significant reduction in pain intensity scores was seen from pre-consult to pre-discharge (6.15 vs 3.6; p < .001). Overall functional improvement, specifically sleep, mobility, and appetite, was seen in 86.6% of patients. Conclusions: Pain management is an area that provides opportunities for pharmacotherapy interventions. Pharmacists' involvement in pain management on an inpatient consult service had a positive impact on pain scores and improvement in functionality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-645
Number of pages7
JournalHospital Pharmacy
Volume51
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Pain Management
Lead
Drug therapy
Pain
Pharmacists
Medical problems
Inpatients
Drug Therapy
Appetite
Palliative Care
Sleep
Retrospective Studies
Health

Keywords

  • Acute pain
  • Chronic pain
  • Pain management
  • Pharmacist

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Mathew, S., Chamberlain, C., Alvarez, K. S., Alvarez, C. A., & Shah, M. (2016). Impact of a pharmacy-led pain management team on adults in an Academic Medical Center. Hospital Pharmacy, 51(8), 639-645. https://doi.org/10.1310/hpj5108-639

Impact of a pharmacy-led pain management team on adults in an Academic Medical Center. / Mathew, Stacy; Chamberlain, Carol; Alvarez, Kristin S.; Alvarez, Carlos A.; Shah, Monal.

In: Hospital Pharmacy, Vol. 51, No. 8, 01.09.2016, p. 639-645.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mathew, S, Chamberlain, C, Alvarez, KS, Alvarez, CA & Shah, M 2016, 'Impact of a pharmacy-led pain management team on adults in an Academic Medical Center', Hospital Pharmacy, vol. 51, no. 8, pp. 639-645. https://doi.org/10.1310/hpj5108-639
Mathew, Stacy ; Chamberlain, Carol ; Alvarez, Kristin S. ; Alvarez, Carlos A. ; Shah, Monal. / Impact of a pharmacy-led pain management team on adults in an Academic Medical Center. In: Hospital Pharmacy. 2016 ; Vol. 51, No. 8. pp. 639-645.
@article{c1f2e29df8da46c4838160a0dbdf2c6c,
title = "Impact of a pharmacy-led pain management team on adults in an Academic Medical Center",
abstract = "Background: Pain is a major health problem affecting more than 15{\%} of adults in the United States. In a multidisciplinary pain management team, pharmacists can optimize pharmacotherapy quality by ensuring safe and appropriate medication use. Objective: Assess the impact of a pharmacy pain medication management service on pain-related outcomes in an adult inpatient population. Methods: This retrospective study evaluated patients who were admitted from November 2009 through November 2011 and received a pharmacy pain consult. Patients were excluded if they left against medical advice, their care was assumed by palliative care, or they had no complaint of pain when seen by the pharmacist. The primary outcome was the difference between each patient's average pain score from pre-consult to post-consult. Secondary outcomes were difference between each patient's average pain score from pre-consult to pre-discharge, overall functional improvement, pharmacist interventions, and 14-day and 30-day readmissions. Results: One hundred patients were included in the final analysis. Eight hundred twenty-one interventions were made by the clinical pharmacists. Patients displayed a significant reduction in their pre- and post-consult pain intensity scores on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale (6.15 vs 3.25; p < .001). Likewise, a significant reduction in pain intensity scores was seen from pre-consult to pre-discharge (6.15 vs 3.6; p < .001). Overall functional improvement, specifically sleep, mobility, and appetite, was seen in 86.6{\%} of patients. Conclusions: Pain management is an area that provides opportunities for pharmacotherapy interventions. Pharmacists' involvement in pain management on an inpatient consult service had a positive impact on pain scores and improvement in functionality.",
keywords = "Acute pain, Chronic pain, Pain management, Pharmacist",
author = "Stacy Mathew and Carol Chamberlain and Alvarez, {Kristin S.} and Alvarez, {Carlos A.} and Monal Shah",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1310/hpj5108-639",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "51",
pages = "639--645",
journal = "Hospital Pharmacy",
issn = "0018-5787",
publisher = "Facts and Comparisons",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of a pharmacy-led pain management team on adults in an Academic Medical Center

AU - Mathew, Stacy

AU - Chamberlain, Carol

AU - Alvarez, Kristin S.

AU - Alvarez, Carlos A.

AU - Shah, Monal

PY - 2016/9/1

Y1 - 2016/9/1

N2 - Background: Pain is a major health problem affecting more than 15% of adults in the United States. In a multidisciplinary pain management team, pharmacists can optimize pharmacotherapy quality by ensuring safe and appropriate medication use. Objective: Assess the impact of a pharmacy pain medication management service on pain-related outcomes in an adult inpatient population. Methods: This retrospective study evaluated patients who were admitted from November 2009 through November 2011 and received a pharmacy pain consult. Patients were excluded if they left against medical advice, their care was assumed by palliative care, or they had no complaint of pain when seen by the pharmacist. The primary outcome was the difference between each patient's average pain score from pre-consult to post-consult. Secondary outcomes were difference between each patient's average pain score from pre-consult to pre-discharge, overall functional improvement, pharmacist interventions, and 14-day and 30-day readmissions. Results: One hundred patients were included in the final analysis. Eight hundred twenty-one interventions were made by the clinical pharmacists. Patients displayed a significant reduction in their pre- and post-consult pain intensity scores on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale (6.15 vs 3.25; p < .001). Likewise, a significant reduction in pain intensity scores was seen from pre-consult to pre-discharge (6.15 vs 3.6; p < .001). Overall functional improvement, specifically sleep, mobility, and appetite, was seen in 86.6% of patients. Conclusions: Pain management is an area that provides opportunities for pharmacotherapy interventions. Pharmacists' involvement in pain management on an inpatient consult service had a positive impact on pain scores and improvement in functionality.

AB - Background: Pain is a major health problem affecting more than 15% of adults in the United States. In a multidisciplinary pain management team, pharmacists can optimize pharmacotherapy quality by ensuring safe and appropriate medication use. Objective: Assess the impact of a pharmacy pain medication management service on pain-related outcomes in an adult inpatient population. Methods: This retrospective study evaluated patients who were admitted from November 2009 through November 2011 and received a pharmacy pain consult. Patients were excluded if they left against medical advice, their care was assumed by palliative care, or they had no complaint of pain when seen by the pharmacist. The primary outcome was the difference between each patient's average pain score from pre-consult to post-consult. Secondary outcomes were difference between each patient's average pain score from pre-consult to pre-discharge, overall functional improvement, pharmacist interventions, and 14-day and 30-day readmissions. Results: One hundred patients were included in the final analysis. Eight hundred twenty-one interventions were made by the clinical pharmacists. Patients displayed a significant reduction in their pre- and post-consult pain intensity scores on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale (6.15 vs 3.25; p < .001). Likewise, a significant reduction in pain intensity scores was seen from pre-consult to pre-discharge (6.15 vs 3.6; p < .001). Overall functional improvement, specifically sleep, mobility, and appetite, was seen in 86.6% of patients. Conclusions: Pain management is an area that provides opportunities for pharmacotherapy interventions. Pharmacists' involvement in pain management on an inpatient consult service had a positive impact on pain scores and improvement in functionality.

KW - Acute pain

KW - Chronic pain

KW - Pain management

KW - Pharmacist

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020467174&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020467174&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1310/hpj5108-639

DO - 10.1310/hpj5108-639

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - 639

EP - 645

JO - Hospital Pharmacy

JF - Hospital Pharmacy

SN - 0018-5787

IS - 8

ER -