Impact of bromocriptine-QR therapy on glycemic control and daily insulin requirement in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects whose dysglycemia is poorly controlled on high-dose insulin

A pilot study

Erin D. Roe, Bindu Chamarthi, Philip Raskin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The concurrent use of a postprandial insulin sensitizing agent, such as bromocriptine-QR, a quick release formulation of bromocriptine, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist, may offer a strategy to improve glycemic control and limit/reduce insulin requirement in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients on high-dose insulin. This open label pilot study evaluated this potential utility of bromocriptine-QR. Methods: Ten T2DM subjects on metformin (1-2gm/day) and high-dose (TDID ≥ 65U/day) basal-bolus insulin were enrolled to receive once daily (morning) bromocriptine-QR (1.6-4.8 mg/day) for 24 weeks. Subjects with at least one postbaseline HbA1c measurement (N = 8) were analyzed for change from baseline HbA<inf>1c</inf>, TDID, and postprandial glucose area under the curve of a four-hour mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT). Results: Compared to the baseline, average HbA<inf>1c</inf>decreased 1.76% (9.74 ± 0.56 to 7.98 ± 0.36, = 0.01), average TDID decreased 27% (199 ± 33 to 147 ± 31, P = 0.009), and MMTT AUC<inf>60-240</inf>decreased 32% (P = 0.04) over the treatment period. The decline in HbA<inf>1c</inf>and TDID was observed at 8 weeks and sustained over the remaining 16-week study duration. Conclusion: In this study, bromocriptine-QR therapy improved glycemic control and meal tolerance while reducing insulin requirement in T2DM subjects poorly controlled on high-dose insulin therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number834903
JournalJournal of Diabetes Research
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Bromocriptine
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Insulin
Meals
Therapeutics
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Metformin
Dopamine Agonists
Area Under Curve
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

@article{f3f8c396dfda45a0ae220a98603e64eb,
title = "Impact of bromocriptine-QR therapy on glycemic control and daily insulin requirement in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects whose dysglycemia is poorly controlled on high-dose insulin: A pilot study",
abstract = "Background. The concurrent use of a postprandial insulin sensitizing agent, such as bromocriptine-QR, a quick release formulation of bromocriptine, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist, may offer a strategy to improve glycemic control and limit/reduce insulin requirement in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients on high-dose insulin. This open label pilot study evaluated this potential utility of bromocriptine-QR. Methods: Ten T2DM subjects on metformin (1-2gm/day) and high-dose (TDID ≥ 65U/day) basal-bolus insulin were enrolled to receive once daily (morning) bromocriptine-QR (1.6-4.8 mg/day) for 24 weeks. Subjects with at least one postbaseline HbA1c measurement (N = 8) were analyzed for change from baseline HbA1c, TDID, and postprandial glucose area under the curve of a four-hour mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT). Results: Compared to the baseline, average HbA1cdecreased 1.76{\%} (9.74 ± 0.56 to 7.98 ± 0.36, = 0.01), average TDID decreased 27{\%} (199 ± 33 to 147 ± 31, P = 0.009), and MMTT AUC60-240decreased 32{\%} (P = 0.04) over the treatment period. The decline in HbA1cand TDID was observed at 8 weeks and sustained over the remaining 16-week study duration. Conclusion: In this study, bromocriptine-QR therapy improved glycemic control and meal tolerance while reducing insulin requirement in T2DM subjects poorly controlled on high-dose insulin therapy.",
author = "Roe, {Erin D.} and Bindu Chamarthi and Philip Raskin",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1155/2015/834903",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2015",
journal = "Journal of Diabetes Research",
issn = "2314-6745",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

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T1 - Impact of bromocriptine-QR therapy on glycemic control and daily insulin requirement in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects whose dysglycemia is poorly controlled on high-dose insulin

T2 - A pilot study

AU - Roe, Erin D.

AU - Chamarthi, Bindu

AU - Raskin, Philip

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background. The concurrent use of a postprandial insulin sensitizing agent, such as bromocriptine-QR, a quick release formulation of bromocriptine, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist, may offer a strategy to improve glycemic control and limit/reduce insulin requirement in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients on high-dose insulin. This open label pilot study evaluated this potential utility of bromocriptine-QR. Methods: Ten T2DM subjects on metformin (1-2gm/day) and high-dose (TDID ≥ 65U/day) basal-bolus insulin were enrolled to receive once daily (morning) bromocriptine-QR (1.6-4.8 mg/day) for 24 weeks. Subjects with at least one postbaseline HbA1c measurement (N = 8) were analyzed for change from baseline HbA1c, TDID, and postprandial glucose area under the curve of a four-hour mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT). Results: Compared to the baseline, average HbA1cdecreased 1.76% (9.74 ± 0.56 to 7.98 ± 0.36, = 0.01), average TDID decreased 27% (199 ± 33 to 147 ± 31, P = 0.009), and MMTT AUC60-240decreased 32% (P = 0.04) over the treatment period. The decline in HbA1cand TDID was observed at 8 weeks and sustained over the remaining 16-week study duration. Conclusion: In this study, bromocriptine-QR therapy improved glycemic control and meal tolerance while reducing insulin requirement in T2DM subjects poorly controlled on high-dose insulin therapy.

AB - Background. The concurrent use of a postprandial insulin sensitizing agent, such as bromocriptine-QR, a quick release formulation of bromocriptine, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist, may offer a strategy to improve glycemic control and limit/reduce insulin requirement in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients on high-dose insulin. This open label pilot study evaluated this potential utility of bromocriptine-QR. Methods: Ten T2DM subjects on metformin (1-2gm/day) and high-dose (TDID ≥ 65U/day) basal-bolus insulin were enrolled to receive once daily (morning) bromocriptine-QR (1.6-4.8 mg/day) for 24 weeks. Subjects with at least one postbaseline HbA1c measurement (N = 8) were analyzed for change from baseline HbA1c, TDID, and postprandial glucose area under the curve of a four-hour mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT). Results: Compared to the baseline, average HbA1cdecreased 1.76% (9.74 ± 0.56 to 7.98 ± 0.36, = 0.01), average TDID decreased 27% (199 ± 33 to 147 ± 31, P = 0.009), and MMTT AUC60-240decreased 32% (P = 0.04) over the treatment period. The decline in HbA1cand TDID was observed at 8 weeks and sustained over the remaining 16-week study duration. Conclusion: In this study, bromocriptine-QR therapy improved glycemic control and meal tolerance while reducing insulin requirement in T2DM subjects poorly controlled on high-dose insulin therapy.

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