Impact of Lifelong Exercise Training Dose on Ventricular-Arterial Coupling

Michinari Hieda, Erin Howden, Shigeki Shibata, Naoki Fujimoto, Paul S. Bhella, Jeffrey L Hastings, Takashi Tarumi Ph.D., Satyam Sarma, Qi Fu, Rong Zhang, Benjamin D Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The dynamic Starling mechanism, as assessed by beat-by-beat changes in stroke volume and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, reflects ventricular-arterial coupling. It deteriorates with age, and is preserved in highly trained masters athletes. Currently, it remains unclear how much exercise over a lifetime is necessary to preserve efficient ventricular-arterial coupling. The purpose of this study was to assess the dose-dependent relationship between lifelong exercise training and the dynamic Starling mechanism in healthy seniors. METHODS: One hundred two seniors were recruited and stratified into 4 groups based on 25 years of exercise training history: sedentary subjects (n=27, <2 sessions/week), casual exercisers (n=25, 2-3 sessions/week), committed exercisers (n=25, 4-5 sessions/week), and competitive Masters Athletes (n=25, 6-7 sessions/week). The dynamic Starling mechanism was estimated by transfer function gain between beat-by-beat changes in diastolic pulmonary artery pressure, a surrogate for left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and stroke volume index. RESULTS: The transfer function gain of pulmonary artery pressure-stroke volume index was markedly enhanced in committed and competitive exercisers compared with more sedentary seniors and correlated with higher peak oxygen uptake (Vo2) and lower left ventricular stiffness. The power spectral density of pulmonary artery pressure was greater in sedentary adults than in committed and competitive exercisers, whereas the power spectral density of stroke volume index was greater in competitive exercisers than in the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: There is a graded, dose-dependent improvement in ventricular-arterial coupling with increasing amounts of lifelong regular exercise in healthy older individuals. Our data suggest that the optimal dose of lifelong endurance exercise to preserve ventricular-arterial coupling with age appears to be at least 4 to 5 sessions per week.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2638-2647
Number of pages10
JournalCirculation
Volume138
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 4 2018

Fingerprint

Stroke Volume
Starlings
Exercise
Pulmonary Artery
Pressure
Athletes
Blood Pressure
Oxygen

Keywords

  • diastole
  • exercise
  • prevention
  • ventricular function
  • ventricular remodeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Impact of Lifelong Exercise Training Dose on Ventricular-Arterial Coupling. / Hieda, Michinari; Howden, Erin; Shibata, Shigeki; Fujimoto, Naoki; Bhella, Paul S.; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Tarumi Ph.D., Takashi; Sarma, Satyam; Fu, Qi; Zhang, Rong; Levine, Benjamin D.

In: Circulation, Vol. 138, No. 23, 04.12.2018, p. 2638-2647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hieda, M, Howden, E, Shibata, S, Fujimoto, N, Bhella, PS, Hastings, JL, Tarumi Ph.D., T, Sarma, S, Fu, Q, Zhang, R & Levine, BD 2018, 'Impact of Lifelong Exercise Training Dose on Ventricular-Arterial Coupling', Circulation, vol. 138, no. 23, pp. 2638-2647. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035116
Hieda, Michinari ; Howden, Erin ; Shibata, Shigeki ; Fujimoto, Naoki ; Bhella, Paul S. ; Hastings, Jeffrey L ; Tarumi Ph.D., Takashi ; Sarma, Satyam ; Fu, Qi ; Zhang, Rong ; Levine, Benjamin D. / Impact of Lifelong Exercise Training Dose on Ventricular-Arterial Coupling. In: Circulation. 2018 ; Vol. 138, No. 23. pp. 2638-2647.
@article{21105944621f467482e908b48bdb0994,
title = "Impact of Lifelong Exercise Training Dose on Ventricular-Arterial Coupling",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The dynamic Starling mechanism, as assessed by beat-by-beat changes in stroke volume and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, reflects ventricular-arterial coupling. It deteriorates with age, and is preserved in highly trained masters athletes. Currently, it remains unclear how much exercise over a lifetime is necessary to preserve efficient ventricular-arterial coupling. The purpose of this study was to assess the dose-dependent relationship between lifelong exercise training and the dynamic Starling mechanism in healthy seniors. METHODS: One hundred two seniors were recruited and stratified into 4 groups based on 25 years of exercise training history: sedentary subjects (n=27, <2 sessions/week), casual exercisers (n=25, 2-3 sessions/week), committed exercisers (n=25, 4-5 sessions/week), and competitive Masters Athletes (n=25, 6-7 sessions/week). The dynamic Starling mechanism was estimated by transfer function gain between beat-by-beat changes in diastolic pulmonary artery pressure, a surrogate for left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and stroke volume index. RESULTS: The transfer function gain of pulmonary artery pressure-stroke volume index was markedly enhanced in committed and competitive exercisers compared with more sedentary seniors and correlated with higher peak oxygen uptake (Vo2) and lower left ventricular stiffness. The power spectral density of pulmonary artery pressure was greater in sedentary adults than in committed and competitive exercisers, whereas the power spectral density of stroke volume index was greater in competitive exercisers than in the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: There is a graded, dose-dependent improvement in ventricular-arterial coupling with increasing amounts of lifelong regular exercise in healthy older individuals. Our data suggest that the optimal dose of lifelong endurance exercise to preserve ventricular-arterial coupling with age appears to be at least 4 to 5 sessions per week.",
keywords = "diastole, exercise, prevention, ventricular function, ventricular remodeling",
author = "Michinari Hieda and Erin Howden and Shigeki Shibata and Naoki Fujimoto and Bhella, {Paul S.} and Hastings, {Jeffrey L} and {Tarumi Ph.D.}, Takashi and Satyam Sarma and Qi Fu and Rong Zhang and Levine, {Benjamin D}",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035116",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "138",
pages = "2638--2647",
journal = "Circulation",
issn = "0009-7322",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "23",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of Lifelong Exercise Training Dose on Ventricular-Arterial Coupling

AU - Hieda, Michinari

AU - Howden, Erin

AU - Shibata, Shigeki

AU - Fujimoto, Naoki

AU - Bhella, Paul S.

AU - Hastings, Jeffrey L

AU - Tarumi Ph.D., Takashi

AU - Sarma, Satyam

AU - Fu, Qi

AU - Zhang, Rong

AU - Levine, Benjamin D

PY - 2018/12/4

Y1 - 2018/12/4

N2 - BACKGROUND: The dynamic Starling mechanism, as assessed by beat-by-beat changes in stroke volume and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, reflects ventricular-arterial coupling. It deteriorates with age, and is preserved in highly trained masters athletes. Currently, it remains unclear how much exercise over a lifetime is necessary to preserve efficient ventricular-arterial coupling. The purpose of this study was to assess the dose-dependent relationship between lifelong exercise training and the dynamic Starling mechanism in healthy seniors. METHODS: One hundred two seniors were recruited and stratified into 4 groups based on 25 years of exercise training history: sedentary subjects (n=27, <2 sessions/week), casual exercisers (n=25, 2-3 sessions/week), committed exercisers (n=25, 4-5 sessions/week), and competitive Masters Athletes (n=25, 6-7 sessions/week). The dynamic Starling mechanism was estimated by transfer function gain between beat-by-beat changes in diastolic pulmonary artery pressure, a surrogate for left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and stroke volume index. RESULTS: The transfer function gain of pulmonary artery pressure-stroke volume index was markedly enhanced in committed and competitive exercisers compared with more sedentary seniors and correlated with higher peak oxygen uptake (Vo2) and lower left ventricular stiffness. The power spectral density of pulmonary artery pressure was greater in sedentary adults than in committed and competitive exercisers, whereas the power spectral density of stroke volume index was greater in competitive exercisers than in the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: There is a graded, dose-dependent improvement in ventricular-arterial coupling with increasing amounts of lifelong regular exercise in healthy older individuals. Our data suggest that the optimal dose of lifelong endurance exercise to preserve ventricular-arterial coupling with age appears to be at least 4 to 5 sessions per week.

AB - BACKGROUND: The dynamic Starling mechanism, as assessed by beat-by-beat changes in stroke volume and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, reflects ventricular-arterial coupling. It deteriorates with age, and is preserved in highly trained masters athletes. Currently, it remains unclear how much exercise over a lifetime is necessary to preserve efficient ventricular-arterial coupling. The purpose of this study was to assess the dose-dependent relationship between lifelong exercise training and the dynamic Starling mechanism in healthy seniors. METHODS: One hundred two seniors were recruited and stratified into 4 groups based on 25 years of exercise training history: sedentary subjects (n=27, <2 sessions/week), casual exercisers (n=25, 2-3 sessions/week), committed exercisers (n=25, 4-5 sessions/week), and competitive Masters Athletes (n=25, 6-7 sessions/week). The dynamic Starling mechanism was estimated by transfer function gain between beat-by-beat changes in diastolic pulmonary artery pressure, a surrogate for left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and stroke volume index. RESULTS: The transfer function gain of pulmonary artery pressure-stroke volume index was markedly enhanced in committed and competitive exercisers compared with more sedentary seniors and correlated with higher peak oxygen uptake (Vo2) and lower left ventricular stiffness. The power spectral density of pulmonary artery pressure was greater in sedentary adults than in committed and competitive exercisers, whereas the power spectral density of stroke volume index was greater in competitive exercisers than in the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: There is a graded, dose-dependent improvement in ventricular-arterial coupling with increasing amounts of lifelong regular exercise in healthy older individuals. Our data suggest that the optimal dose of lifelong endurance exercise to preserve ventricular-arterial coupling with age appears to be at least 4 to 5 sessions per week.

KW - diastole

KW - exercise

KW - prevention

KW - ventricular function

KW - ventricular remodeling

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058919411&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85058919411&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035116

DO - 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035116

M3 - Article

C2 - 30571254

AN - SCOPUS:85058919411

VL - 138

SP - 2638

EP - 2647

JO - Circulation

JF - Circulation

SN - 0009-7322

IS - 23

ER -