Impact of multiple placental pathologies on neonatal death, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and neurodevelopmental impairment in preterm infants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: To determine the association of placental pathology, including multiple placental lesions, with the occurrence and severity of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), death, and neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in preterm infants. Method: A retrospective cohort study of neonates <29 weeks gestational age (GA) born at Parkland Hospital from 08/2009 to 08/2012. Infants were stratified as follows: Group 1: no significant placental pathology; Group 2: single significant placental lesion; and Group 3: ≥2 placental lesions (multiple lesions). Primary outcome was death and/or BPD. Two-year neurodevelopmental follow-up was compared. Results: In all, 42% (100/241) of infants had one placental lesion, and 34% (82/241) ≥2 lesions. As the number of the pathologic lesions increased (no lesions vs. 1 vs. ≥2), the occurrence of death or BPD increased (25%, 37%, and 52%, respectively; P = 0.004). Moreover, infants with multiple pathologic lesions were more likely to have NDI (29%, 29%, and 46%, respectively; P = 0.03). After logistic regression, infants with multiple pathologic lesions were more likely to develop moderate-to-severe BPD [P < 0.01; OR 3.9 (1.5–10.1)] but not NDI. Conclusion(s): Neonates <29 weeks GA with multiple placental pathologic lesions have an increased risk for developing BPD, suggesting an interaction between placental inflammation and vascular pathology and the pathogenesis of BPD; however, the risk of NDI is not increased.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)885-891
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Research
Volume87
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of multiple placental pathologies on neonatal death, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and neurodevelopmental impairment in preterm infants'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this