Impact of risk assessment and tailored versus non-tailored risk information on colorectal cancer testing in primary care: A randomized controlled trial

Celette Sugg Skinner, Ethan A. Halm, Wendy Pechero Bishop, Chul Ahn, Samir Gupta, David Farrell, Jay Morrow, Manjula Julka, Katharine McCallister, Joanne M. Sanders, Emily Marks, Susan M. Rawl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Colorectal cancer screening is effective but underused. Guidelines for which tests are recommended and at what intervals depend on specific risks. We developed a tablet-based Cancer Risk Intake System (CRIS) that asks questions about risk prior to appointments and generates tailored printouts for patients and physicians summarizing and matching risk factors with guideline-based recommendations. Methods: Randomized controlled trial among patients who: (i) used CRIS and they and their physicians received tailored printouts; (ii) used CRIS to answer questions but received standard information about cancer screening while their physicians received a standard electronic chart prompt indicating they were age-eligible but not currently adherent for colorectal cancer screening; or (iii) comprised a no-contact group that neither used CRIS nor received any information while their physicians received the standard prompt. Participation in testing was assessed via electronic medical record at 12 months. Results: Participation in any colorectal cancer testing was three times higher for those who used the CRIS and received any printed materials, compared with no-contact controls (47% vs. 16%; P < 0.0001).Among CRIS users ages 50 and older, participation in any testing was higher in the tailored group (53% vs. 44%, P=0.023). Conclusion: Use of CRIS and receipt of any information facilitated participation in testing. There was more testing participation in the CRIS-tailored than non-tailored group. Impact: Asking patients questions about their specific risk factors and giving them and their providers information just prior to an appointment may increase participation in colorectal cancer testing. Tailoring the information has some added benefit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1523-1530
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume24
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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