Improved survival and reduced phenotypic severity following AAV9/MECP2 gene transfer to neonatal and juvenile male Mecp2 knockout mice

Kamal Ke Gadalla, Mark Es Bailey, Rosemary C. Spike, Paul D. Ross, Kenton T. Woodard, Sahana Nagabhushan Kalburgi, Lavanya Bachaboina, Jie V. Deng, Anne E. West, R. Jude Samulski, Steven J. Gray, Stuart R. Cobb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Typical Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pediatric disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. The demonstrated reversibility of RTT-like phenotypes in mice suggests that MECP2 gene replacement is a potential therapeutic option in patients. We report improvements in survival and phenotypic severity in Mecp2-null male mice after neonatal intracranial delivery of a single-stranded (ss) AAV9/chicken β-actin (CBA)-MECP2 vector. Median survival was 16.6 weeks for MECP2-treated versus 9.3 weeks for green fluorescent protein (GFP)-treated mice. ssAAV9/CBA-MECP2-treated mice also showed significant improvement in the phenotype severity score, in locomotor function, and in exploratory activity, as well as a normalization of neuronal nuclear volume in transduced cells. Wild-type (WT) mice receiving neonatal injections of the same ssAAV9/CBA-MECP2 vector did not show any significant deficits, suggesting a tolerance for modest MeCP2 overexpression. To test a MECP2 gene replacement approach in a manner more relevant for human translation, a self-complementary (sc) adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector designed to drive MeCP2 expression from a fragment of the Mecp2 promoter was injected intravenously (IV) into juvenile (4-5 weeks old) Mecp2-null mice. While the brain transduction efficiency in juvenile mice was low (∼2-4% of neurons), modest improvements in survival were still observed. These results support the concept of MECP2 gene therapy for RTT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-30
Number of pages13
JournalMolecular Therapy
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery

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    Gadalla, K. K., Bailey, M. E., Spike, R. C., Ross, P. D., Woodard, K. T., Kalburgi, S. N., Bachaboina, L., Deng, J. V., West, A. E., Samulski, R. J., Gray, S. J., & Cobb, S. R. (2013). Improved survival and reduced phenotypic severity following AAV9/MECP2 gene transfer to neonatal and juvenile male Mecp2 knockout mice. Molecular Therapy, 21(1), 18-30. https://doi.org/10.1038/mt.2012.200