In search of improved fat transfer viability: A quantitative analysis of the role of centrifugation and harvest site

Rod J. Rohrich, Evan S. Sorokin, Spencer A. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

225 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fat grafting is an unpredictable procedure that continues to challenge the field of plastic surgery due to irregular resorption. Applications for this procedure are broad in both reconstructive and cosmetic plastic surgery. Fat grafts are carefully obtained and manipulated to obtain better graft takes and results, yet there is no universal agreement on what constitutes an ideal methodology. The present study examines adipocyte viability from four commonly used donor sites in five subjects. No statistical differences in adipocyte viability were demonstrated among abdominal fat, thigh fat, flank fat, or knee fat donor sites that were immediately removed and untreated (p < 0.225). In addition, no differences were observed in representative tissue samples that were removed and centrifuged (thigh, p = 0.508; knee, p = 0.302; flank, p = 0.088; abdomen, p = 0.533). On the basis of these quantitative data, neither harvest location nor centrifugation demonstrated any advantage in terms of lipocyte viability. Fat tissue transfers from these common sites may be considered equal, and centrifugation does not appear to enhance immediate fat tissue viability before implantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-395
Number of pages5
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume113
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004

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Centrifugation
Fats
Plastic Surgery
Adipocytes
Thigh
Knee
Transplants
Tissue Survival
Abdominal Fat
Abdomen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

In search of improved fat transfer viability : A quantitative analysis of the role of centrifugation and harvest site. / Rohrich, Rod J.; Sorokin, Evan S.; Brown, Spencer A.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 113, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 391-395.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rohrich, Rod J. ; Sorokin, Evan S. ; Brown, Spencer A. / In search of improved fat transfer viability : A quantitative analysis of the role of centrifugation and harvest site. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 113, No. 1. pp. 391-395.
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