In vitro evaluation of lipids adsorbed on silicone hydrogel contact lenses using a new gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analytical method.

Miyoko Iwata, Sadanori Ohno, Tetsuji Kawai, Hideji Ichijima, H. Dwight Cavanagh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To establish a new analytical method using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for evaluating the lipids adsorbed on silicone hydrogel (SH) contact lenses: cholesterol, cholesterol ester, wax, and squalene. METHODS: A novel GC/MS method was developed and validated for the repeatability, specificity, linearity, detection and quantitation limits, and percentage recovery. The lipids in an artificial tear solution were adsorbed on 5 SH lenses (asmofilcon A, balafilcon A, galyfilcon A, lotrafilcon A, and lotrafilcon B) and 1 conventional hydrogel lens (etafilcon A) in vitro. The lipids adsorbed were then extracted and analyzed by the GC/MS method. RESULTS: Repeatability of this analytical method was less than 2.2% deviation for all test lipids; however, the analytes were completely discriminated with sharp peak shapes, and identified specifically. The correlation coefficient showing linearity was at least 0.991 under 50 microg/mL of lipid concentration. Detection and quantitation limits were statistically 0.5 to 0.8 microg/mL and 1.4 to 2.5 microg/mL, respectively, for all analytes. Percentage recovery was estimated as approximately 80% for 3 microg/lens, 90% for 5 microg/lens, and almost 100% for larger amounts of lipids. Quantitatively, the lipids absorbed on contact lenses were lotrafilcon A = (near equal) lotrafilcon B = (near equal) etafilcon A < asmofilcon A < galyfilcon A = (near equal) balafilcon A with the value of 0.4 to 7.6 microg/lens. Lipid adsorption on SH lenses varied depending on the lipid components and lens surface properties. CONCLUSIONS: The GC/MS method established in this study is excellent for the repeatability, specificity, linearity, detection and quantitation limits, and percentage recovery, and provides a novel highly sensitive and useful tool for evaluating lipids adsorbed on SH lenses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)272-280
Number of pages9
JournalEye & contact lens
Volume34
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Hydrogel
Contact Lenses
Silicones
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Lenses
Lipids
Limit of Detection
In Vitro Techniques
Squalene
Surface Properties
Cholesterol Esters
Waxes
Adsorption
Cholesterol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

In vitro evaluation of lipids adsorbed on silicone hydrogel contact lenses using a new gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analytical method. / Iwata, Miyoko; Ohno, Sadanori; Kawai, Tetsuji; Ichijima, Hideji; Cavanagh, H. Dwight.

In: Eye & contact lens, Vol. 34, No. 5, 09.2008, p. 272-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a22723e5d20e4c0ca67f28f4488657a0,
title = "In vitro evaluation of lipids adsorbed on silicone hydrogel contact lenses using a new gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analytical method.",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To establish a new analytical method using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for evaluating the lipids adsorbed on silicone hydrogel (SH) contact lenses: cholesterol, cholesterol ester, wax, and squalene. METHODS: A novel GC/MS method was developed and validated for the repeatability, specificity, linearity, detection and quantitation limits, and percentage recovery. The lipids in an artificial tear solution were adsorbed on 5 SH lenses (asmofilcon A, balafilcon A, galyfilcon A, lotrafilcon A, and lotrafilcon B) and 1 conventional hydrogel lens (etafilcon A) in vitro. The lipids adsorbed were then extracted and analyzed by the GC/MS method. RESULTS: Repeatability of this analytical method was less than 2.2{\%} deviation for all test lipids; however, the analytes were completely discriminated with sharp peak shapes, and identified specifically. The correlation coefficient showing linearity was at least 0.991 under 50 microg/mL of lipid concentration. Detection and quantitation limits were statistically 0.5 to 0.8 microg/mL and 1.4 to 2.5 microg/mL, respectively, for all analytes. Percentage recovery was estimated as approximately 80{\%} for 3 microg/lens, 90{\%} for 5 microg/lens, and almost 100{\%} for larger amounts of lipids. Quantitatively, the lipids absorbed on contact lenses were lotrafilcon A = (near equal) lotrafilcon B = (near equal) etafilcon A < asmofilcon A < galyfilcon A = (near equal) balafilcon A with the value of 0.4 to 7.6 microg/lens. Lipid adsorption on SH lenses varied depending on the lipid components and lens surface properties. CONCLUSIONS: The GC/MS method established in this study is excellent for the repeatability, specificity, linearity, detection and quantitation limits, and percentage recovery, and provides a novel highly sensitive and useful tool for evaluating lipids adsorbed on SH lenses.",
author = "Miyoko Iwata and Sadanori Ohno and Tetsuji Kawai and Hideji Ichijima and Cavanagh, {H. Dwight}",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "272--280",
journal = "Eye and Contact Lense",
issn = "1542-2321",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In vitro evaluation of lipids adsorbed on silicone hydrogel contact lenses using a new gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analytical method.

AU - Iwata, Miyoko

AU - Ohno, Sadanori

AU - Kawai, Tetsuji

AU - Ichijima, Hideji

AU - Cavanagh, H. Dwight

PY - 2008/9

Y1 - 2008/9

N2 - PURPOSE: To establish a new analytical method using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for evaluating the lipids adsorbed on silicone hydrogel (SH) contact lenses: cholesterol, cholesterol ester, wax, and squalene. METHODS: A novel GC/MS method was developed and validated for the repeatability, specificity, linearity, detection and quantitation limits, and percentage recovery. The lipids in an artificial tear solution were adsorbed on 5 SH lenses (asmofilcon A, balafilcon A, galyfilcon A, lotrafilcon A, and lotrafilcon B) and 1 conventional hydrogel lens (etafilcon A) in vitro. The lipids adsorbed were then extracted and analyzed by the GC/MS method. RESULTS: Repeatability of this analytical method was less than 2.2% deviation for all test lipids; however, the analytes were completely discriminated with sharp peak shapes, and identified specifically. The correlation coefficient showing linearity was at least 0.991 under 50 microg/mL of lipid concentration. Detection and quantitation limits were statistically 0.5 to 0.8 microg/mL and 1.4 to 2.5 microg/mL, respectively, for all analytes. Percentage recovery was estimated as approximately 80% for 3 microg/lens, 90% for 5 microg/lens, and almost 100% for larger amounts of lipids. Quantitatively, the lipids absorbed on contact lenses were lotrafilcon A = (near equal) lotrafilcon B = (near equal) etafilcon A < asmofilcon A < galyfilcon A = (near equal) balafilcon A with the value of 0.4 to 7.6 microg/lens. Lipid adsorption on SH lenses varied depending on the lipid components and lens surface properties. CONCLUSIONS: The GC/MS method established in this study is excellent for the repeatability, specificity, linearity, detection and quantitation limits, and percentage recovery, and provides a novel highly sensitive and useful tool for evaluating lipids adsorbed on SH lenses.

AB - PURPOSE: To establish a new analytical method using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for evaluating the lipids adsorbed on silicone hydrogel (SH) contact lenses: cholesterol, cholesterol ester, wax, and squalene. METHODS: A novel GC/MS method was developed and validated for the repeatability, specificity, linearity, detection and quantitation limits, and percentage recovery. The lipids in an artificial tear solution were adsorbed on 5 SH lenses (asmofilcon A, balafilcon A, galyfilcon A, lotrafilcon A, and lotrafilcon B) and 1 conventional hydrogel lens (etafilcon A) in vitro. The lipids adsorbed were then extracted and analyzed by the GC/MS method. RESULTS: Repeatability of this analytical method was less than 2.2% deviation for all test lipids; however, the analytes were completely discriminated with sharp peak shapes, and identified specifically. The correlation coefficient showing linearity was at least 0.991 under 50 microg/mL of lipid concentration. Detection and quantitation limits were statistically 0.5 to 0.8 microg/mL and 1.4 to 2.5 microg/mL, respectively, for all analytes. Percentage recovery was estimated as approximately 80% for 3 microg/lens, 90% for 5 microg/lens, and almost 100% for larger amounts of lipids. Quantitatively, the lipids absorbed on contact lenses were lotrafilcon A = (near equal) lotrafilcon B = (near equal) etafilcon A < asmofilcon A < galyfilcon A = (near equal) balafilcon A with the value of 0.4 to 7.6 microg/lens. Lipid adsorption on SH lenses varied depending on the lipid components and lens surface properties. CONCLUSIONS: The GC/MS method established in this study is excellent for the repeatability, specificity, linearity, detection and quantitation limits, and percentage recovery, and provides a novel highly sensitive and useful tool for evaluating lipids adsorbed on SH lenses.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=58149346029&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=58149346029&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 272

EP - 280

JO - Eye and Contact Lense

JF - Eye and Contact Lense

SN - 1542-2321

IS - 5

ER -