In vitro evaluation of novel polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery

Maham Rahimi, Aniket Wadajkar, Khaushik Subramanian, Monet Yousef, Weina Cui, Jer Tsong Hsieh, Kytai Truong Nguyen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previously uncharacterized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-allylamine)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized using silane-coated MNPs as a template for radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide, acrylamide, and allylamine. Properties of these nanoparticles such as size, biocompatibility, drug loading efficiency, and drug release kinetics were evaluated in vitro for targeted and controlled drug delivery. Spherical core-shell nanoparticles with a diameter of 100 nm showed significantly lower systemic toxicity than did bare MNPs, as well as doxorubicin encapsulation efficiency of 72%, and significantly higher doxorubicin release at 41°C compared with 37°C, demonstrating their temperature sensitivity. Released drugs were also active in destroying prostate cancer cells (JHU31). Furthermore, the nanoparticle uptake by JHU31 cells was dependent on dose and incubation time, reaching saturation at 500 μg/mL and 4 hours, respectively. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging capabilities of the particles were observed using agarose platforms containing cells incubated with nanoparticles. Future work includes investigation of targeting capability and effectiveness of these nanoparticles in vivo using animal models. From the Clinical Editor: In this paper, previously uncharacterized magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized using silane-coated MNPs as a template for radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide, acrylamide, and allylamine. Various properties of these nanoparticles were evaluated in vitro for targeted drug delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)672-680
Number of pages9
JournalNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

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Controlled drug delivery
Nanoparticles
Polymers
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Allylamine
Acrylamide
Silanes
Free radical polymerization
Polymerization
Doxorubicin
In Vitro Techniques
Magnetic resonance
Biocompatibility
Encapsulation
Sepharose
Toxicity
Prostatic Neoplasms
Animals
Animal Models
Pharmacokinetics

Keywords

  • Doxorubicin
  • Magnetic nanoparticles
  • Prostate cancer
  • Temperature-responsive polymers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

In vitro evaluation of novel polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery. / Rahimi, Maham; Wadajkar, Aniket; Subramanian, Khaushik; Yousef, Monet; Cui, Weina; Hsieh, Jer Tsong; Nguyen, Kytai Truong.

In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 5, 10.2010, p. 672-680.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rahimi, Maham ; Wadajkar, Aniket ; Subramanian, Khaushik ; Yousef, Monet ; Cui, Weina ; Hsieh, Jer Tsong ; Nguyen, Kytai Truong. / In vitro evaluation of novel polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery. In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 6, No. 5. pp. 672-680.
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