In vivo assessment of pituitary gland volume with magnetic resonance imaging: The effect of age

S. N. Lurie, P. M. Doraiswamy, M. M. Husain, O. B. Boyko, E. H. Ellinwood, G. S. Figiel, K. R R Krishnan

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Abstract

We used sagittal and coronal T1 weighted magnetic resonance images, at 1.5 Tesla, to measure the height, width, length, and cross-sectional area and to generate two estimates of pituitary gland volume in 35 normal volunteers aged 26-79 yr (19 females and 16 males). Subjects over 50 yr of age had significantly smaller pituitary gland height (P = 0.03), area (P = 0.04), and volume (P = 0.04) than those under 50 yr (by two-tailed t test). Overall, age was negatively correlated with pituitary volume (V1: r = -0.51; P = 0.003; V2: r = -0.47; P = 0.008), area (r = -0.43; P = 0.009), and height (r = -0.46; P = 0.005), but not with pituitary length or width. There were no statistically significant differences in pituitary size between men and women (by two-tailed t test). These findings suggest that pituitary gland height provides a good single measure for the assessment of pituitary gland size and that age must be controlled for in studies of pituitary gland size.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-508
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume71
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1990

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Pituitary Gland
Magnetic resonance
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Imaging techniques
Healthy Volunteers
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Lurie, S. N., Doraiswamy, P. M., Husain, M. M., Boyko, O. B., Ellinwood, E. H., Figiel, G. S., & Krishnan, K. R. R. (1990). In vivo assessment of pituitary gland volume with magnetic resonance imaging: The effect of age. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 71(2), 505-508.

In vivo assessment of pituitary gland volume with magnetic resonance imaging : The effect of age. / Lurie, S. N.; Doraiswamy, P. M.; Husain, M. M.; Boyko, O. B.; Ellinwood, E. H.; Figiel, G. S.; Krishnan, K. R R.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 71, No. 2, 08.1990, p. 505-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lurie, SN, Doraiswamy, PM, Husain, MM, Boyko, OB, Ellinwood, EH, Figiel, GS & Krishnan, KRR 1990, 'In vivo assessment of pituitary gland volume with magnetic resonance imaging: The effect of age', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 71, no. 2, pp. 505-508.
Lurie, S. N. ; Doraiswamy, P. M. ; Husain, M. M. ; Boyko, O. B. ; Ellinwood, E. H. ; Figiel, G. S. ; Krishnan, K. R R. / In vivo assessment of pituitary gland volume with magnetic resonance imaging : The effect of age. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1990 ; Vol. 71, No. 2. pp. 505-508.
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