In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells

Dawen Zhao, Jason H. Stafford, Heling Zhou, Philip E. Thorpe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Phosphatidylserine (PS), normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, becomes exposed on the outer surface of viable (non-apoptotic) endothelial cells in tumor blood vessels, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we optically imaged exposed PS on tumor vasculature in vivo using PGN635, a novel human monoclonal antibody that targets PS. PGN635 F(ab′)2 was labeled with the near infrared (NIR) dye, IRDye 800CW. Human glioma U87 cells or breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into nude mice. When the tumors reached ∼5 mm in diameter, 800CW- PGN635 was injected via a tail vein and in vivo dynamic NIR imaging was performed. For U87 gliomas, NIR imaging allowed clear detection of tumors as early as 4 h later, which improved over time to give a maximal tumor/normal ratio (TNR = 2.9 ± 0.5) 24 h later. Similar results were observed for orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast tumors. Localization of 800CW-PGN635 to tumors was antigen specific since 800CW-Aurexis, a control probe of irrelevant specificity, did not localize to the tumors, and pre-administration of unlabeled PGN635 blocked the uptake of 800CW-PGN635. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that 800CW-PGN635 was binding to PS-positive tumor vascular endothelium. Our studies suggest that tumor vasculature can be successfully imaged in vivo to provide sensitive tumor detection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume8596
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
EventReporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications V - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 4 2013Feb 6 2013

Other

OtherReporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications V
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period2/4/132/6/13

Fingerprint

Endothelial cells
Tumors
tumors
Endothelial Cells
Imaging techniques
Phosphatidylserines
Neoplasms
Glioma
multiple docking adapters
Infrared imaging
Vascular Tissue Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
breast
Tumor Microenvironment
Vascular Endothelium
Neoplasm Antigens
Fluorescence Microscopy
Nude Mice
endothelium
Tail

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • glioma
  • near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging
  • Phosphatidylserine (PS)
  • tumor vasculature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Zhao, D., Stafford, J. H., Zhou, H., & Thorpe, P. E. (2013). In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 8596). [859603] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2007291

In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells. / Zhao, Dawen; Stafford, Jason H.; Zhou, Heling; Thorpe, Philip E.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8596 2013. 859603.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Zhao, D, Stafford, JH, Zhou, H & Thorpe, PE 2013, In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 8596, 859603, Reporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications V, San Francisco, CA, United States, 2/4/13. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2007291
Zhao D, Stafford JH, Zhou H, Thorpe PE. In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8596. 2013. 859603 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2007291
Zhao, Dawen ; Stafford, Jason H. ; Zhou, Heling ; Thorpe, Philip E. / In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8596 2013.
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