Incidence of spontaneous ocular lesions in laboratory rabbits

Dana L. Holve, Karen E. Mundwiler, Stacy L. Pritt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Laboratory rabbits are commonly used for ocular drug and device studies. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of spontaneous ocular lesions in laboratory rabbits with respect to sex, breed, and supplier. We retrospectively evaluated ophthalmic examination records of rabbits screened between April 2008 and April 2010. These 1840 records represented 572 black Dutch belted (DB), 1022 New Zealand white (NZW), and 246 NZW x New Zealand red F1 crosses (WRF1). Rabbits were between 6 and 16 wk of age and had been received from 5 suppliers. Ocular structures evaluated were the cornea, lens, iris and vitreous with respect to sex, breed and supplier. A total of 177 rabbits (9.6%) and 233 eyes (6.3%) were effected. Of total rabbits, 15.3% males and 7.3% females were affected. The most common structure affected was the cornea in 5.7% of rabbits, (DB 11.7%, NZW 3.0%, and NZR 3.3%). The lens at 3.6% was second most common (DB 2.1%, NZW 4.6%, and NZR 3.3%). Both iris (0.2%) and vitreous (0.3%) were not significantly affected. Significant sex-breeder-supplier combinations were: cornea DB supplier D, supplier D females, supplier D males, DB males and NZR females; and lens: NZW females; and at least one affected ocular structure: NZW supplier D, supplier D females, DB males, NZW females, and NZR females. Breed, sex, and supplier were significant variables of ocular lesions in laboratory rabbits. Investigators should consider each of these variables when choosing rabbits for ocular studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)436-440
Number of pages5
JournalComparative Medicine
Volume61
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • veterinary(all)

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