Incidental discovery of a chronically thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm: case report and literature review

Chris Y. Wu, John E. Rectenwald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic spontaneously thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are rare. We present a patient with a completely thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm found incidentally on imaging for evaluation of unrelated abdominal pain. The patient was asymptomatic with regards to the aneurysm due to extensive collateralization of the intercostal and lumbar arteries to the bilateral hypogastric and internal mammary arteries to the common femoral arteries bilaterally. Follow-up imaging after 10 months showed no aneurysmal change. Further study is needed regarding indications for elective repair, medical therapy, and surveillance modality and schedule for patients with chronically occluded AAAs as these patients are at risk for aneurysm rupture and thrombus propagation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Fingerprint

Incidental Findings
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Thrombosis
Aneurysm
Mammary Arteries
Femoral Artery
Abdominal Pain
Rupture
Appointments and Schedules
Arteries
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Incidental discovery of a chronically thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm : case report and literature review. / Wu, Chris Y.; Rectenwald, John E.

In: Annals of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 29, No. 5, 01.07.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{daf7a8ac30a04eaf82eddcb9820b15d2,
title = "Incidental discovery of a chronically thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm: case report and literature review",
abstract = "Chronic spontaneously thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are rare. We present a patient with a completely thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm found incidentally on imaging for evaluation of unrelated abdominal pain. The patient was asymptomatic with regards to the aneurysm due to extensive collateralization of the intercostal and lumbar arteries to the bilateral hypogastric and internal mammary arteries to the common femoral arteries bilaterally. Follow-up imaging after 10 months showed no aneurysmal change. Further study is needed regarding indications for elective repair, medical therapy, and surveillance modality and schedule for patients with chronically occluded AAAs as these patients are at risk for aneurysm rupture and thrombus propagation.",
author = "Wu, {Chris Y.} and Rectenwald, {John E.}",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.avsg.2015.01.004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
journal = "Annals of Vascular Surgery",
issn = "0890-5096",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Incidental discovery of a chronically thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm

T2 - case report and literature review

AU - Wu, Chris Y.

AU - Rectenwald, John E.

PY - 2015/7/1

Y1 - 2015/7/1

N2 - Chronic spontaneously thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are rare. We present a patient with a completely thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm found incidentally on imaging for evaluation of unrelated abdominal pain. The patient was asymptomatic with regards to the aneurysm due to extensive collateralization of the intercostal and lumbar arteries to the bilateral hypogastric and internal mammary arteries to the common femoral arteries bilaterally. Follow-up imaging after 10 months showed no aneurysmal change. Further study is needed regarding indications for elective repair, medical therapy, and surveillance modality and schedule for patients with chronically occluded AAAs as these patients are at risk for aneurysm rupture and thrombus propagation.

AB - Chronic spontaneously thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are rare. We present a patient with a completely thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm found incidentally on imaging for evaluation of unrelated abdominal pain. The patient was asymptomatic with regards to the aneurysm due to extensive collateralization of the intercostal and lumbar arteries to the bilateral hypogastric and internal mammary arteries to the common femoral arteries bilaterally. Follow-up imaging after 10 months showed no aneurysmal change. Further study is needed regarding indications for elective repair, medical therapy, and surveillance modality and schedule for patients with chronically occluded AAAs as these patients are at risk for aneurysm rupture and thrombus propagation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85006282629&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85006282629&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.avsg.2015.01.004

DO - 10.1016/j.avsg.2015.01.004

M3 - Article

C2 - 25770381

AN - SCOPUS:84931578937

VL - 29

JO - Annals of Vascular Surgery

JF - Annals of Vascular Surgery

SN - 0890-5096

IS - 5

ER -