Incomplete data

What you don't know might hurt you

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Molecular epidemiology studies commonly exhibit missing observations. Methods for extracting correct and efficient analyses from incomplete data are well known in statistics, but relatively few such methods have diffused into applications. I review some areas of incomplete data research that are relevant to molecular epidemiology and appeal for greater efforts by statisticians to translate their methods into practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1567-1570
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

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Molecular Epidemiology
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Incomplete data : What you don't know might hurt you. / Heitjan, Daniel F.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 20, No. 8, 01.08.2011, p. 1567-1570.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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