Increase in transforming growth factor-β in the brain during infection is related to fever, not depression of spontaneous motor activity

S. Matsumura, T. Shibakusa, T. Fujikawa, H. Yamada, K. Inoue, T. Fushiki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When viral infection occurs, this information is transmitted to the brain, and symptoms such as fever and tiredness are induced. One of the causes of these symptoms is the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in blood and the brain. In this study, the i.p. administration of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a synthetic double-stranded RNA, to rats was used as an infection model. Poly I:C decreased spontaneous motor activity (SMA) 2 h after i.p. administration, and this decrease was maintained thereafter. The concentration of active transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) increased 1 h after the administration. This increase occurred earlier than those in the concentrations of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), in serum. The intracisternal administration of an anti-TGF-β antibody partially inhibited fever induced by poly I:C administration; however, this treatment did not affect the decrease in SMA. Furthermore, intracisternal administration of TGF-β raised the body temperature. These results indicate that TGF-β in the brain, which was increased by poly I:C administration, is associated with fever but not with a decrease in SMA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1133-1140
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroscience
Volume144
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 9 2007

Fingerprint

Poly I-C
Transforming Growth Factors
Motor Activity
Fever
Brain
Infection
Cytokines
Double-Stranded RNA
Virus Diseases
Body Temperature
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Interleukin-6
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Antibodies
Serum

Keywords

  • cerebrospinal fluid
  • infection
  • polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid
  • proinflammatory cytokine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Increase in transforming growth factor-β in the brain during infection is related to fever, not depression of spontaneous motor activity. / Matsumura, S.; Shibakusa, T.; Fujikawa, T.; Yamada, H.; Inoue, K.; Fushiki, T.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 144, No. 3, 09.02.2007, p. 1133-1140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsumura, S. ; Shibakusa, T. ; Fujikawa, T. ; Yamada, H. ; Inoue, K. ; Fushiki, T. / Increase in transforming growth factor-β in the brain during infection is related to fever, not depression of spontaneous motor activity. In: Neuroscience. 2007 ; Vol. 144, No. 3. pp. 1133-1140.
@article{7a79bd2ed05f416c9a84aa35f3b7c330,
title = "Increase in transforming growth factor-β in the brain during infection is related to fever, not depression of spontaneous motor activity",
abstract = "When viral infection occurs, this information is transmitted to the brain, and symptoms such as fever and tiredness are induced. One of the causes of these symptoms is the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in blood and the brain. In this study, the i.p. administration of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a synthetic double-stranded RNA, to rats was used as an infection model. Poly I:C decreased spontaneous motor activity (SMA) 2 h after i.p. administration, and this decrease was maintained thereafter. The concentration of active transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) increased 1 h after the administration. This increase occurred earlier than those in the concentrations of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), in serum. The intracisternal administration of an anti-TGF-β antibody partially inhibited fever induced by poly I:C administration; however, this treatment did not affect the decrease in SMA. Furthermore, intracisternal administration of TGF-β raised the body temperature. These results indicate that TGF-β in the brain, which was increased by poly I:C administration, is associated with fever but not with a decrease in SMA.",
keywords = "cerebrospinal fluid, infection, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, proinflammatory cytokine",
author = "S. Matsumura and T. Shibakusa and T. Fujikawa and H. Yamada and K. Inoue and T. Fushiki",
year = "2007",
month = "2",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuroscience.2006.10.037",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "144",
pages = "1133--1140",
journal = "Neuroscience",
issn = "0306-4522",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increase in transforming growth factor-β in the brain during infection is related to fever, not depression of spontaneous motor activity

AU - Matsumura, S.

AU - Shibakusa, T.

AU - Fujikawa, T.

AU - Yamada, H.

AU - Inoue, K.

AU - Fushiki, T.

PY - 2007/2/9

Y1 - 2007/2/9

N2 - When viral infection occurs, this information is transmitted to the brain, and symptoms such as fever and tiredness are induced. One of the causes of these symptoms is the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in blood and the brain. In this study, the i.p. administration of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a synthetic double-stranded RNA, to rats was used as an infection model. Poly I:C decreased spontaneous motor activity (SMA) 2 h after i.p. administration, and this decrease was maintained thereafter. The concentration of active transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) increased 1 h after the administration. This increase occurred earlier than those in the concentrations of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), in serum. The intracisternal administration of an anti-TGF-β antibody partially inhibited fever induced by poly I:C administration; however, this treatment did not affect the decrease in SMA. Furthermore, intracisternal administration of TGF-β raised the body temperature. These results indicate that TGF-β in the brain, which was increased by poly I:C administration, is associated with fever but not with a decrease in SMA.

AB - When viral infection occurs, this information is transmitted to the brain, and symptoms such as fever and tiredness are induced. One of the causes of these symptoms is the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in blood and the brain. In this study, the i.p. administration of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a synthetic double-stranded RNA, to rats was used as an infection model. Poly I:C decreased spontaneous motor activity (SMA) 2 h after i.p. administration, and this decrease was maintained thereafter. The concentration of active transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) increased 1 h after the administration. This increase occurred earlier than those in the concentrations of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), in serum. The intracisternal administration of an anti-TGF-β antibody partially inhibited fever induced by poly I:C administration; however, this treatment did not affect the decrease in SMA. Furthermore, intracisternal administration of TGF-β raised the body temperature. These results indicate that TGF-β in the brain, which was increased by poly I:C administration, is associated with fever but not with a decrease in SMA.

KW - cerebrospinal fluid

KW - infection

KW - polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid

KW - proinflammatory cytokine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33845883791&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33845883791&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2006.10.037

DO - 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2006.10.037

M3 - Article

C2 - 17156928

AN - SCOPUS:33845883791

VL - 144

SP - 1133

EP - 1140

JO - Neuroscience

JF - Neuroscience

SN - 0306-4522

IS - 3

ER -