Increased acetabular depth may influence physeal stability in slipped capital femoral epiphysis hip

David A. Podeszwa, David Gurd, Anthony Riccio, Adriana De La Rocha, Daniel J. Sucato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Multiple mechanical factors affecting the hip have been associated with the development of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Whether acetabular depth plays a role in the development of a SCFE has not been elucidated. Questions/purposes: (1) What is the prevalence of a deep acetabulum in SCFE? (2) Is the presence of a deep acetabulum associated with physeal instability? (3) Is the presence of a deep acetabulum associated with the occurrence of a contralateral SCFE? Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 232 patients (156 males) who presented with a unilateral SCFE. Fifty (22%) subsequently developed a contralateral SCFE. The involved and uninvolved sides were evaluated for the presence of a deep acetabulum (DA). Preoperative radiographic parameters, slip stability, development of a contralateral SCFE, and demographic factors were then compared between patients with and without DA. Results: DA was present in 120 hips (52%) with a SCFE. DA was more common in females (55 of 76 [72%]) than males (65 of 156 [42%]). Patients with DA presented with a higher lateral center-edge angle (33 versus 31), slip angle (52 versus 43), and with a lower body mass index (28.1 versus 30.0 kg/m 2). Increased acetabular depth was more common in patients with an unstable SCFE (29 of 41 [71%]) than those with a stable SCFE (91 of 191 [48%]). The presence of DA either on the affected side or the contralateral side did not predict a contralateral SCFE. Conclusions: Despite not predicting a contralateral SCFE, DA may influence physeal stability if a SCFE does develop. Therefore, the contralateral hip with DA should be closely monitored. Level of Evidence: Level II, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2151-2155
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Volume471
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

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Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphyses
Acetabulum
Hip

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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Increased acetabular depth may influence physeal stability in slipped capital femoral epiphysis hip. / Podeszwa, David A.; Gurd, David; Riccio, Anthony; De La Rocha, Adriana; Sucato, Daniel J.

In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Vol. 471, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 2151-2155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Increased acetabular depth may influence physeal stability in slipped capital femoral epiphysis hip",
abstract = "Background: Multiple mechanical factors affecting the hip have been associated with the development of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Whether acetabular depth plays a role in the development of a SCFE has not been elucidated. Questions/purposes: (1) What is the prevalence of a deep acetabulum in SCFE? (2) Is the presence of a deep acetabulum associated with physeal instability? (3) Is the presence of a deep acetabulum associated with the occurrence of a contralateral SCFE? Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 232 patients (156 males) who presented with a unilateral SCFE. Fifty (22{\%}) subsequently developed a contralateral SCFE. The involved and uninvolved sides were evaluated for the presence of a deep acetabulum (DA). Preoperative radiographic parameters, slip stability, development of a contralateral SCFE, and demographic factors were then compared between patients with and without DA. Results: DA was present in 120 hips (52{\%}) with a SCFE. DA was more common in females (55 of 76 [72{\%}]) than males (65 of 156 [42{\%}]). Patients with DA presented with a higher lateral center-edge angle (33 versus 31), slip angle (52 versus 43), and with a lower body mass index (28.1 versus 30.0 kg/m 2). Increased acetabular depth was more common in patients with an unstable SCFE (29 of 41 [71{\%}]) than those with a stable SCFE (91 of 191 [48{\%}]). The presence of DA either on the affected side or the contralateral side did not predict a contralateral SCFE. Conclusions: Despite not predicting a contralateral SCFE, DA may influence physeal stability if a SCFE does develop. Therefore, the contralateral hip with DA should be closely monitored. Level of Evidence: Level II, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.",
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AU - Podeszwa, David A.

AU - Gurd, David

AU - Riccio, Anthony

AU - De La Rocha, Adriana

AU - Sucato, Daniel J.

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N2 - Background: Multiple mechanical factors affecting the hip have been associated with the development of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Whether acetabular depth plays a role in the development of a SCFE has not been elucidated. Questions/purposes: (1) What is the prevalence of a deep acetabulum in SCFE? (2) Is the presence of a deep acetabulum associated with physeal instability? (3) Is the presence of a deep acetabulum associated with the occurrence of a contralateral SCFE? Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 232 patients (156 males) who presented with a unilateral SCFE. Fifty (22%) subsequently developed a contralateral SCFE. The involved and uninvolved sides were evaluated for the presence of a deep acetabulum (DA). Preoperative radiographic parameters, slip stability, development of a contralateral SCFE, and demographic factors were then compared between patients with and without DA. Results: DA was present in 120 hips (52%) with a SCFE. DA was more common in females (55 of 76 [72%]) than males (65 of 156 [42%]). Patients with DA presented with a higher lateral center-edge angle (33 versus 31), slip angle (52 versus 43), and with a lower body mass index (28.1 versus 30.0 kg/m 2). Increased acetabular depth was more common in patients with an unstable SCFE (29 of 41 [71%]) than those with a stable SCFE (91 of 191 [48%]). The presence of DA either on the affected side or the contralateral side did not predict a contralateral SCFE. Conclusions: Despite not predicting a contralateral SCFE, DA may influence physeal stability if a SCFE does develop. Therefore, the contralateral hip with DA should be closely monitored. Level of Evidence: Level II, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

AB - Background: Multiple mechanical factors affecting the hip have been associated with the development of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Whether acetabular depth plays a role in the development of a SCFE has not been elucidated. Questions/purposes: (1) What is the prevalence of a deep acetabulum in SCFE? (2) Is the presence of a deep acetabulum associated with physeal instability? (3) Is the presence of a deep acetabulum associated with the occurrence of a contralateral SCFE? Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 232 patients (156 males) who presented with a unilateral SCFE. Fifty (22%) subsequently developed a contralateral SCFE. The involved and uninvolved sides were evaluated for the presence of a deep acetabulum (DA). Preoperative radiographic parameters, slip stability, development of a contralateral SCFE, and demographic factors were then compared between patients with and without DA. Results: DA was present in 120 hips (52%) with a SCFE. DA was more common in females (55 of 76 [72%]) than males (65 of 156 [42%]). Patients with DA presented with a higher lateral center-edge angle (33 versus 31), slip angle (52 versus 43), and with a lower body mass index (28.1 versus 30.0 kg/m 2). Increased acetabular depth was more common in patients with an unstable SCFE (29 of 41 [71%]) than those with a stable SCFE (91 of 191 [48%]). The presence of DA either on the affected side or the contralateral side did not predict a contralateral SCFE. Conclusions: Despite not predicting a contralateral SCFE, DA may influence physeal stability if a SCFE does develop. Therefore, the contralateral hip with DA should be closely monitored. Level of Evidence: Level II, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

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