Increased cardiometabolic dysfunction in first-degree relatives of patients with psychotic disorders

Suraj Sarvode Mothi, Neeraj Tandon, Jaya Padmanabhan, Ian T. Mathew, Brett Clementz, Carol Tamminga, Godfrey Pearlson, John Sweeney, Matcheri S. Keshavan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Elevated prevalence of comorbid cardio-vascular and metabolic dysfunction (CMD) is consistently reported in patients with severe psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective (SZA) and bipolar disorder (BP-P). Since both psychosis and CMD are substantively heritable in nature, we attempted to investigate the occurrence of CMD disorders in first-degree relatives of probands with psychosis. Methods: Our sample included 861 probands with a diagnosis of SZ (n = 354), SZA (n = 212) and BP-P (n = 295), 776 first-degree relatives of probands and 416 healthy controls. Logistic regression was used to compare prevalence of any CMD disorders (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia or coronary artery disease) across groups. Post hoc tests of independence checked for CMD prevalence across psychosis diagnosis (SZ, SZA and BP-P), both in relatives of probands and within probands themselves. Results: After controlling for potential confounders, first-degree relatives with (p < 0.001) and without (p = 0.03) Axis I non-psychotic or Axis- II cluster disorders were at a significant risk for CMD compared to controls. No significant difference (p = 0.42) was observed in prevalence of CMD between relatives of SZ, SZA and BP-P, or between psychosis diagnoses for probands (p = 0.25). Discussion: Prevalence of CMD was increased in the first-degree relatives of psychosis subjects. This finding suggests the possibility of overlapping genetic contributions to CMD and psychosis. Increased somatic disease burden in relatives of psychotic disorder probands points to need for early detection and preventive efforts in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-107
Number of pages5
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume165
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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Psychotic Disorders
Blood Vessels
Schizophrenia
Hyperlipidemias
Bipolar Disorder
Coronary Artery Disease
Logistic Models
Hypertension
Population

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Psychotic disorder
  • Relatives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Mothi, S. S., Tandon, N., Padmanabhan, J., Mathew, I. T., Clementz, B., Tamminga, C., ... Keshavan, M. S. (2015). Increased cardiometabolic dysfunction in first-degree relatives of patients with psychotic disorders. Schizophrenia Research, 165(1), 103-107. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2015.03.034

Increased cardiometabolic dysfunction in first-degree relatives of patients with psychotic disorders. / Mothi, Suraj Sarvode; Tandon, Neeraj; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Mathew, Ian T.; Clementz, Brett; Tamminga, Carol; Pearlson, Godfrey; Sweeney, John; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

In: Schizophrenia Research, Vol. 165, No. 1, 01.06.2015, p. 103-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mothi, SS, Tandon, N, Padmanabhan, J, Mathew, IT, Clementz, B, Tamminga, C, Pearlson, G, Sweeney, J & Keshavan, MS 2015, 'Increased cardiometabolic dysfunction in first-degree relatives of patients with psychotic disorders', Schizophrenia Research, vol. 165, no. 1, pp. 103-107. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2015.03.034
Mothi, Suraj Sarvode ; Tandon, Neeraj ; Padmanabhan, Jaya ; Mathew, Ian T. ; Clementz, Brett ; Tamminga, Carol ; Pearlson, Godfrey ; Sweeney, John ; Keshavan, Matcheri S. / Increased cardiometabolic dysfunction in first-degree relatives of patients with psychotic disorders. In: Schizophrenia Research. 2015 ; Vol. 165, No. 1. pp. 103-107.
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