Increasing use of antidepressants in pregnancy

William O. Cooper, Mary E. Willy, Stephen J. Pont, Wayne A. Ray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

302 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to quantify the rate of exposures to antidepressants during pregnancy in a large cohort of women. Study Design: This was a retrospective cohort study of 105,335 pregnancies among women enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid from 1999-2003. Pregnancies were classified according to antidepressant exposures during pregnancy using previously validated computerized pharmacy records linked with birth certificates. Results: During the study period, 8.7% of women giving birth had exposure to any antidepressant; 6.2% had exposure to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Maternal age > 25 years (P < .0001), white race (P < .0001), and education > 12 years (P = .008) were significant predictors of antidepressant exposure. The proportion of pregnancies with antidepressant use increased from 5.7% of pregnancies in 1999 to 13.4% of pregnancies in 2003 (p<.0001). The increase was mostly accounted for by increases in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposures. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for further studies that better quantify the fetal consequences of exposure to antidepressants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume196
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

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Antidepressive Agents
Pregnancy
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Birth Certificates
Maternal Age
Medicaid
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Parturition

Keywords

  • antidepressants
  • fetal effects
  • medication exposures
  • pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Increasing use of antidepressants in pregnancy. / Cooper, William O.; Willy, Mary E.; Pont, Stephen J.; Ray, Wayne A.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 196, No. 6, 06.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cooper, William O. ; Willy, Mary E. ; Pont, Stephen J. ; Ray, Wayne A. / Increasing use of antidepressants in pregnancy. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2007 ; Vol. 196, No. 6.
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