Independent pathways for secretion of cholesterol and apolipoprotein E by macrophages

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cholesterol-loaded macrophages secrete cholesterol and apolipoprotein E. The current studies show that this secretion occurs by two independent pathways. In the absence of serum, the cells secrete apolipoprotein E, but not cholesterol. In the presence of monensin (an inhibitor of protein secretion), the cells secrete cholesterol, but little apolipoprotein E. After secretion, apolipoprotein E and cholesterol associate with high-density lipoprotein to form a particle that can deliver cholesterol to the liver by receptor-mediated endocytosis. We conclude that apolipoprotein E does not function to remove cholesterol from macrophages but rather to participate in "reverse cholesterol transport.".

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)871-873
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume219
Issue number4586
StatePublished - 1983

Fingerprint

Secretory Pathway
Apolipoproteins E
Macrophages
Cholesterol
Monensin
HDL Lipoproteins
Endocytosis
Liver
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Independent pathways for secretion of cholesterol and apolipoprotein E by macrophages. / Basu, Sandip K.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.

In: Science, Vol. 219, No. 4586, 1983, p. 871-873.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{982360a522a6426c8f07f9de847eaf6f,
title = "Independent pathways for secretion of cholesterol and apolipoprotein E by macrophages",
abstract = "Cholesterol-loaded macrophages secrete cholesterol and apolipoprotein E. The current studies show that this secretion occurs by two independent pathways. In the absence of serum, the cells secrete apolipoprotein E, but not cholesterol. In the presence of monensin (an inhibitor of protein secretion), the cells secrete cholesterol, but little apolipoprotein E. After secretion, apolipoprotein E and cholesterol associate with high-density lipoprotein to form a particle that can deliver cholesterol to the liver by receptor-mediated endocytosis. We conclude that apolipoprotein E does not function to remove cholesterol from macrophages but rather to participate in {"}reverse cholesterol transport.{"}.",
author = "Basu, {Sandip K.} and Goldstein, {Joseph L.} and Brown, {Michael S.}",
year = "1983",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "219",
pages = "871--873",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "4586",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Independent pathways for secretion of cholesterol and apolipoprotein E by macrophages

AU - Basu, Sandip K.

AU - Goldstein, Joseph L.

AU - Brown, Michael S.

PY - 1983

Y1 - 1983

N2 - Cholesterol-loaded macrophages secrete cholesterol and apolipoprotein E. The current studies show that this secretion occurs by two independent pathways. In the absence of serum, the cells secrete apolipoprotein E, but not cholesterol. In the presence of monensin (an inhibitor of protein secretion), the cells secrete cholesterol, but little apolipoprotein E. After secretion, apolipoprotein E and cholesterol associate with high-density lipoprotein to form a particle that can deliver cholesterol to the liver by receptor-mediated endocytosis. We conclude that apolipoprotein E does not function to remove cholesterol from macrophages but rather to participate in "reverse cholesterol transport.".

AB - Cholesterol-loaded macrophages secrete cholesterol and apolipoprotein E. The current studies show that this secretion occurs by two independent pathways. In the absence of serum, the cells secrete apolipoprotein E, but not cholesterol. In the presence of monensin (an inhibitor of protein secretion), the cells secrete cholesterol, but little apolipoprotein E. After secretion, apolipoprotein E and cholesterol associate with high-density lipoprotein to form a particle that can deliver cholesterol to the liver by receptor-mediated endocytosis. We conclude that apolipoprotein E does not function to remove cholesterol from macrophages but rather to participate in "reverse cholesterol transport.".

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020665553&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020665553&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 6823554

AN - SCOPUS:0020665553

VL - 219

SP - 871

EP - 873

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 4586

ER -