Induced autoimmunity to heat shock proteins elicits glaucomatous loss of retinal ganglion cell neurons via activated T-cell-derived fas-ligand

Martin B. Wax, Gülgün Tezel, Junjie Yang, Guanghua Peng, Rajkumar V. Patil, Neeraj Agarwal, Rebecca M. Sappington, David J. Calkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

117 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glaucomatous optic neuropathy causes blindness through the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, which comprise the optic nerve. Glaucoma traditionally is associated with elevated intraocular pressure, but often occurs or may progress with intraocular pressure in the normal range. Like other diseases of the CNS, a subset of glaucoma has been proposed to involve an autoimmune component to help explain the loss of RGCs in the absence of elevated intraocular pressure. One hypothesis involves heat shock proteins (HSPs), because increased serum levels of HSP autoantibodies are prominent in some glaucoma patients with normal pressures. In the first direct support of this hypothesis, we found that HSP27 and HSP60 immunization in the Lewis rat induced RGC degeneration and axon loss 1- 4 months later in vivo in a pattern with similarities to human glaucoma, including topographic specificity of cell loss. Infiltration of increased numbers of T-cells in the retina occurred much earlier, 14 -21 d after HSP immunization, and appeared to be transient. In vitro studies found that T-cells activated by HSP immunization induced RGC apoptosis via the release of the inflammatory cytokine FasL, whereas HSP immunization induced activation of microglia cells and upregulation of the FasL receptor in RGCs. In summary, our results suggest that RGC degeneration in glaucoma for selected individuals likely involves failed immunoregulation of the T-cell-RGC axis and is thus a disturbance of both proapoptotic and protective pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12085-12096
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume28
Issue number46
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 12 2008

Fingerprint

Fas Ligand Protein
Retinal Ganglion Cells
Heat-Shock Proteins
Autoimmunity
Glaucoma
T-Lymphocytes
Neurons
Immunization
Intraocular Pressure
Axons
Optic Nerve Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Microglia
Blindness
Optic Nerve
Autoantibodies
Retina
Reference Values
Up-Regulation
Apoptosis

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • FasL
  • Glaucoma
  • Heat shock proteins
  • Microglia
  • T-cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Induced autoimmunity to heat shock proteins elicits glaucomatous loss of retinal ganglion cell neurons via activated T-cell-derived fas-ligand. / Wax, Martin B.; Tezel, Gülgün; Yang, Junjie; Peng, Guanghua; Patil, Rajkumar V.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Sappington, Rebecca M.; Calkins, David J.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 28, No. 46, 12.11.2008, p. 12085-12096.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wax, Martin B. ; Tezel, Gülgün ; Yang, Junjie ; Peng, Guanghua ; Patil, Rajkumar V. ; Agarwal, Neeraj ; Sappington, Rebecca M. ; Calkins, David J. / Induced autoimmunity to heat shock proteins elicits glaucomatous loss of retinal ganglion cell neurons via activated T-cell-derived fas-ligand. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2008 ; Vol. 28, No. 46. pp. 12085-12096.
@article{6792e6f36a4440a58505a9ac834a00bc,
title = "Induced autoimmunity to heat shock proteins elicits glaucomatous loss of retinal ganglion cell neurons via activated T-cell-derived fas-ligand",
abstract = "Glaucomatous optic neuropathy causes blindness through the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, which comprise the optic nerve. Glaucoma traditionally is associated with elevated intraocular pressure, but often occurs or may progress with intraocular pressure in the normal range. Like other diseases of the CNS, a subset of glaucoma has been proposed to involve an autoimmune component to help explain the loss of RGCs in the absence of elevated intraocular pressure. One hypothesis involves heat shock proteins (HSPs), because increased serum levels of HSP autoantibodies are prominent in some glaucoma patients with normal pressures. In the first direct support of this hypothesis, we found that HSP27 and HSP60 immunization in the Lewis rat induced RGC degeneration and axon loss 1- 4 months later in vivo in a pattern with similarities to human glaucoma, including topographic specificity of cell loss. Infiltration of increased numbers of T-cells in the retina occurred much earlier, 14 -21 d after HSP immunization, and appeared to be transient. In vitro studies found that T-cells activated by HSP immunization induced RGC apoptosis via the release of the inflammatory cytokine FasL, whereas HSP immunization induced activation of microglia cells and upregulation of the FasL receptor in RGCs. In summary, our results suggest that RGC degeneration in glaucoma for selected individuals likely involves failed immunoregulation of the T-cell-RGC axis and is thus a disturbance of both proapoptotic and protective pathways.",
keywords = "Autoimmunity, FasL, Glaucoma, Heat shock proteins, Microglia, T-cells",
author = "Wax, {Martin B.} and G{\"u}lg{\"u}n Tezel and Junjie Yang and Guanghua Peng and Patil, {Rajkumar V.} and Neeraj Agarwal and Sappington, {Rebecca M.} and Calkins, {David J.}",
year = "2008",
month = "11",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3200-08.2008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "12085--12096",
journal = "Journal of Neuroscience",
issn = "0270-6474",
publisher = "Society for Neuroscience",
number = "46",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Induced autoimmunity to heat shock proteins elicits glaucomatous loss of retinal ganglion cell neurons via activated T-cell-derived fas-ligand

AU - Wax, Martin B.

AU - Tezel, Gülgün

AU - Yang, Junjie

AU - Peng, Guanghua

AU - Patil, Rajkumar V.

AU - Agarwal, Neeraj

AU - Sappington, Rebecca M.

AU - Calkins, David J.

PY - 2008/11/12

Y1 - 2008/11/12

N2 - Glaucomatous optic neuropathy causes blindness through the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, which comprise the optic nerve. Glaucoma traditionally is associated with elevated intraocular pressure, but often occurs or may progress with intraocular pressure in the normal range. Like other diseases of the CNS, a subset of glaucoma has been proposed to involve an autoimmune component to help explain the loss of RGCs in the absence of elevated intraocular pressure. One hypothesis involves heat shock proteins (HSPs), because increased serum levels of HSP autoantibodies are prominent in some glaucoma patients with normal pressures. In the first direct support of this hypothesis, we found that HSP27 and HSP60 immunization in the Lewis rat induced RGC degeneration and axon loss 1- 4 months later in vivo in a pattern with similarities to human glaucoma, including topographic specificity of cell loss. Infiltration of increased numbers of T-cells in the retina occurred much earlier, 14 -21 d after HSP immunization, and appeared to be transient. In vitro studies found that T-cells activated by HSP immunization induced RGC apoptosis via the release of the inflammatory cytokine FasL, whereas HSP immunization induced activation of microglia cells and upregulation of the FasL receptor in RGCs. In summary, our results suggest that RGC degeneration in glaucoma for selected individuals likely involves failed immunoregulation of the T-cell-RGC axis and is thus a disturbance of both proapoptotic and protective pathways.

AB - Glaucomatous optic neuropathy causes blindness through the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, which comprise the optic nerve. Glaucoma traditionally is associated with elevated intraocular pressure, but often occurs or may progress with intraocular pressure in the normal range. Like other diseases of the CNS, a subset of glaucoma has been proposed to involve an autoimmune component to help explain the loss of RGCs in the absence of elevated intraocular pressure. One hypothesis involves heat shock proteins (HSPs), because increased serum levels of HSP autoantibodies are prominent in some glaucoma patients with normal pressures. In the first direct support of this hypothesis, we found that HSP27 and HSP60 immunization in the Lewis rat induced RGC degeneration and axon loss 1- 4 months later in vivo in a pattern with similarities to human glaucoma, including topographic specificity of cell loss. Infiltration of increased numbers of T-cells in the retina occurred much earlier, 14 -21 d after HSP immunization, and appeared to be transient. In vitro studies found that T-cells activated by HSP immunization induced RGC apoptosis via the release of the inflammatory cytokine FasL, whereas HSP immunization induced activation of microglia cells and upregulation of the FasL receptor in RGCs. In summary, our results suggest that RGC degeneration in glaucoma for selected individuals likely involves failed immunoregulation of the T-cell-RGC axis and is thus a disturbance of both proapoptotic and protective pathways.

KW - Autoimmunity

KW - FasL

KW - Glaucoma

KW - Heat shock proteins

KW - Microglia

KW - T-cells

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=58149345559&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=58149345559&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3200-08.2008

DO - 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3200-08.2008

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 12085

EP - 12096

JO - Journal of Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Neuroscience

SN - 0270-6474

IS - 46

ER -