Infectious complications during peripheral intravenous therapy with Teflon® catheters

A prospective study

J. S. Garland, D. B. Nelson, T. E. Cheah, H. H. Hennes, T. M. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infectious complication rates and associated risk factors occurring during peripheral intravenous therapy with Teflon® catheters were determined during a prospective study of 286 cannula insertions. Suppurative phlebitis, cannula-related sepsis or suspected sepsis did not occur. Semiquantitative cannula cultures revealed a colonization rate of 10.4% (12 of 115). Coagulase-negative nonadherent Staphylococcus was the most common colonizing organism occurring in 10 of 12 positive catheters. Alpha Streptococcus and adherent coagulase-negative Staphylococcus colonized the remaining catheters. Colonization was not related to the rate of phlebitis, extravasation or cannulation time. No patient- or catheter-related factors increased the risk of colonization. In children in a general pediatric ward the risk of catheter colonization and subsequent sepsis should not be used as reasons for routinely removing complication-free peripheral Teflon® catheters at 72 hours.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)918-921
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume6
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1987

Fingerprint

Polytetrafluoroethylene
Catheters
Prospective Studies
Phlebitis
Sepsis
Coagulase
Staphylococcus
Therapeutics
Patients' Rooms
Streptococcus
Catheterization
Pediatrics
Cannula

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Infectious complications during peripheral intravenous therapy with Teflon® catheters : A prospective study. / Garland, J. S.; Nelson, D. B.; Cheah, T. E.; Hennes, H. H.; Johnson, T. M.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 6, No. 10, 1987, p. 918-921.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garland, J. S. ; Nelson, D. B. ; Cheah, T. E. ; Hennes, H. H. ; Johnson, T. M. / Infectious complications during peripheral intravenous therapy with Teflon® catheters : A prospective study. In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 1987 ; Vol. 6, No. 10. pp. 918-921.
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