Inferior turbinate surgery in children

A survey of practice patterns

Zi Yang Jiang, Kevin D. Pereira, Norman R. Friedman, Ron B. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: A variety of techniques for inferior turbinate reduction have been used in children, but to date practice patterns have not been studied. The purpose of this survey was to study the practice of inferior turbinate surgery among pediatric otolaryngologists. Study Design: Cross-sectional survey study. Methods: A questionnaire was sent electronically to American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngologists members. Results: A total of 249 questionnaires were sent, and 103 (41%) were completed. Six questionnaires were eliminated due to incompleteness. Seventy-nine (81%) respondents performed inferior turbinate surgery. The most common reason for not performing the procedure was lack of outcomes data. Coblation was the most common technique used in 51% of respondents. A change in surgical technique in the last 2 to 5 years, most commonly to coblation or microdebridement, was reported by 53% of respondents. Nasal obstruction was the primary indication for turbinate reduction (81%), followed by sleep-disordered breathing (16%). Respondents reported that 20% of turbinate reductions were sole procedures, and 80% were with other procedures: adenotonsillectomy, septoplasty, and sinus surgery. Fifty-six (71%) responders were either satisfied or very satisfied with the results of pediatric turbinate surgery. Failure of the procedure, epistaxis, and nasal crusting were commonly reported complications, and 9% reported major complications. Conclusions: A high proportion of pediatric otolaryngologists perform inferior turbinate surgery, most commonly for nasal obstruction. Coblation is the most common technique used, and complications are mostly minor. Physician satisfaction rates are high despite a paucity of outcomes data on the procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1620-1623
Number of pages4
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume122
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Fingerprint

Turbinates
Pediatrics
Nasal Obstruction
Cross-Sectional Studies
Epistaxis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Nose
Physicians

Keywords

  • child
  • nose
  • obstruction
  • Turbinate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Inferior turbinate surgery in children : A survey of practice patterns. / Jiang, Zi Yang; Pereira, Kevin D.; Friedman, Norman R.; Mitchell, Ron B.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 122, No. 7, 07.2012, p. 1620-1623.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jiang, Zi Yang ; Pereira, Kevin D. ; Friedman, Norman R. ; Mitchell, Ron B. / Inferior turbinate surgery in children : A survey of practice patterns. In: Laryngoscope. 2012 ; Vol. 122, No. 7. pp. 1620-1623.
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