Inflammatory properties of bile from dogs with pigment gallstones

Robert V Rege, Jay B. Prystowsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Gallbladder inflammation and mucus hypersecretion are prominent features of cholesterol and pigment gallstones in humans and animals. The factors leading to inflammation and mucus hypersecretion are poorly understood. These studies examine the inflammatory potential of bile from dogs with pigment gallstones. METHODS: Dogs fed a methionine-deficient diet that produces pigment gallstones by 6 weeks were compared to normal dogs. Mucus layer thickness, myeloperoxidase activity, and interleukin-1- like activities were measured in canine gallbladder. The inflammatory potential of canine bile was determined by measuring mucus layer thickness, sodium absorption, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1-like activity in guinea pig gallbladders exposed to normal and lithogenic canine bile for 4 hours. RESULTS: Mean mucus layer thickness, myeloperoxidase, and interleukin- 1 activity were significantly greater in canine gallbladders containing pigment gallstones. Bile from dogs with pigment gallstones markedly increased mucus layer thickness, myeloperoxidase activity, and interleukin-1 activity and decreased sodium absorption in normal guinea pig gallbladder. These effects were not eliminated by centrifuging bile to remove crystals and gallstones. CONCLUSIONS: Canine bile from dogs with pigment gallstones contains soluble factors capable of causing inflammation in the gallbladder wall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-201
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume171
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1996

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Gallstones
Bile
Mucus
Dogs
Canidae
Gallbladder
Interleukin-1
Peroxidase
Cholecystitis
Guinea Pigs
Sodium
Methionine
Cholesterol
Diet
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Inflammatory properties of bile from dogs with pigment gallstones. / Rege, Robert V; Prystowsky, Jay B.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 171, No. 1, 01.1996, p. 197-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Gallbladder inflammation and mucus hypersecretion are prominent features of cholesterol and pigment gallstones in humans and animals. The factors leading to inflammation and mucus hypersecretion are poorly understood. These studies examine the inflammatory potential of bile from dogs with pigment gallstones. METHODS: Dogs fed a methionine-deficient diet that produces pigment gallstones by 6 weeks were compared to normal dogs. Mucus layer thickness, myeloperoxidase activity, and interleukin-1- like activities were measured in canine gallbladder. The inflammatory potential of canine bile was determined by measuring mucus layer thickness, sodium absorption, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1-like activity in guinea pig gallbladders exposed to normal and lithogenic canine bile for 4 hours. RESULTS: Mean mucus layer thickness, myeloperoxidase, and interleukin- 1 activity were significantly greater in canine gallbladders containing pigment gallstones. Bile from dogs with pigment gallstones markedly increased mucus layer thickness, myeloperoxidase activity, and interleukin-1 activity and decreased sodium absorption in normal guinea pig gallbladder. These effects were not eliminated by centrifuging bile to remove crystals and gallstones. CONCLUSIONS: Canine bile from dogs with pigment gallstones contains soluble factors capable of causing inflammation in the gallbladder wall.",
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AB - BACKGROUND: Gallbladder inflammation and mucus hypersecretion are prominent features of cholesterol and pigment gallstones in humans and animals. The factors leading to inflammation and mucus hypersecretion are poorly understood. These studies examine the inflammatory potential of bile from dogs with pigment gallstones. METHODS: Dogs fed a methionine-deficient diet that produces pigment gallstones by 6 weeks were compared to normal dogs. Mucus layer thickness, myeloperoxidase activity, and interleukin-1- like activities were measured in canine gallbladder. The inflammatory potential of canine bile was determined by measuring mucus layer thickness, sodium absorption, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1-like activity in guinea pig gallbladders exposed to normal and lithogenic canine bile for 4 hours. RESULTS: Mean mucus layer thickness, myeloperoxidase, and interleukin- 1 activity were significantly greater in canine gallbladders containing pigment gallstones. Bile from dogs with pigment gallstones markedly increased mucus layer thickness, myeloperoxidase activity, and interleukin-1 activity and decreased sodium absorption in normal guinea pig gallbladder. These effects were not eliminated by centrifuging bile to remove crystals and gallstones. CONCLUSIONS: Canine bile from dogs with pigment gallstones contains soluble factors capable of causing inflammation in the gallbladder wall.

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