Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices: Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry

Ken Tatebe, Elizabeth Ramsay, Charles Mougenot, Mohammad Kazem, Hamed Peikari, Michael Bronskill, Rajiv Chopra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of providing valuable real-time feedback during medical procedures, partly due to the excellent soft-tissue contrast available. Several technical hurdles still exist to seamless integration of medical devices with MRI due to incompatibility of most conventional devices with this imaging modality. In this study, the effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field caused by the magnetization of medical devices was examined using finite element analysis modeling. As an example, the influence of the geometric and material characteristics of a transurethral high-intensity ultrasound applicator on temperature measurements using proton resonance frequency (PRF)-shift thermometry was investigated. Methods: The effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field, caused by the magnetization of medical device components, was examined using finite element analysis modeling. The thermometry artifact generated by a transurethral ultrasound applicator was simulated, and these results were validated against analytic models and scans of an applicator in a phantom. Several parameters were then varied to identify which most strongly impacted the level of simulated thermometry artifact, which varies as the applicator moves over the course of an ablative high-intensity ultrasound treatment. Results: Key design parameters identified as having a strong influence on the magnitude of thermometry artifact included the susceptibility of materials and their volume. The location of components was also important, particularly when positioned to maximize symmetry of the device. Finally, the location of component edges and the inclination of the device relative to the magnetic field were also found to be important factors. Conclusions: Previous design strategies to minimize thermometry artifact were validated, and novel design strategies were identified that substantially reduce PRF-shift thermometry artifacts for a variety of device orientations. These new strategies are being incorporated into the next generation of applicators. The general strategy described in this study can be applied to the design of other interventional devices intended for use with MRI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-253
Number of pages13
JournalMedical Physics
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Interventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Thermometry
Artifacts
Protons
Equipment and Supplies
Magnetic Fields
Finite Element Analysis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • artifact
  • MRI
  • symmetry
  • thermometry
  • ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices : Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry. / Tatebe, Ken; Ramsay, Elizabeth; Mougenot, Charles; Kazem, Mohammad; Peikari, Hamed; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv.

In: Medical Physics, Vol. 43, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 241-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tatebe, Ken ; Ramsay, Elizabeth ; Mougenot, Charles ; Kazem, Mohammad ; Peikari, Hamed ; Bronskill, Michael ; Chopra, Rajiv. / Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices : Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry. In: Medical Physics. 2016 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 241-253.
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