Informed Consent for Cancer Screening with Prostate-Specific Antigen: How Well Are Men Getting the Message?

Evelyn C Y Chan, Sally W. Vernon, Frederick T. O'Donnell, Chul Ahn, Anthony Greisinger, Donnie W. Aga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. This study examined knowledge about prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening among African Americans and Whites. Because PSA screening for prostate cancer is controversial, professional organizations recommend informed consent for screening. Methods. Men (n=304) attending outpatient clinics were surveyed for their knowledge about and experience with screening. Results. Most men did not know the key facts about screening with PSA. African Americans appeared less knowledgeable than Whites, but these differences were mediated by differences in educational level and experience with prostate cancer screening. Conclusions. Public health efforts to improve informed consent for prostate cancer screening should focus on highlighting the key facts and developing different approaches for men at different levels of formal education and prior experience with screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)779-785
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume93
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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