Informing cancer prevention strategies for African Americans: The relationship of African American acculturation to fruit, vegetable, and fat intake

Jamy D. Ard, Celette Sugg Skinner, Chuhe Chen, Mikel Aickin, Laura P. Svetkey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Acculturation has been associated with health-related behaviors in African Americans. We sought to determine if there is a relationship between acculturation and dietary intake in African Americans. African Americans in the PREMIER trial completed the African American Acculturation Scale (AAAS) and 2 nonconsecutive 24-h dietary recalls (n = 238). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and canonical correlation were used to assess relationships between acculturation and dietary intakes. Canonical correlation (p = 0.05) showed that traditional African Americans had lower intakes of fruits/vegetables and milk/dairy with higher intakes of fats, meat, and nuts. This pattern was supported by differences in the ANOVA. African American acculturation is related to dietary intake. These findings have implications for the design of cancer-related public health messages targeted to African Amercans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-247
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • African Americans
  • Canonical correlation
  • Dietary intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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