Inhibition of carbohydrate oxidation during the first minute of reperfusion after brief ischemia: NMR detection of hyperpolarized 13CO 2 and H13CO3-

Matthew E. Merritt, Crystal Harrison, Charles Storey, A. Dean Sherry, Craig R. Malloy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

77 Scopus citations

Abstract

Isolated rat hearts were studied by 31P NMR and 13C NMR. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate was supplied to control normoxic hearts and production of [1-13C]lactate, [1-13C]alanine, 13CO2 and H13CO3- was monitored with 1-s temporal resolution. Hearts were also subjected to 10 min of global ischemia followed by reperfusion. Developed pressure, heart rate, oxygen consumption, [ATP], [phosphocreatine], and pH recovered within 3 min after the ischemic period. During the first 90 s of reperfusion, [1-13C]alanine and [1-13C]lactate appeared rapidly, demonstrating metabolism of pyruvate through two enzymes largely confined to the cytosol, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase. 13CO2 and H13CO3- were not detected. Late after ischemia and reperfusion, the products of pyruvate dehydrogenase, 13CO 2 and H13CO3- were easily detected. Using this multinuclear NMR approach, we established that during the first 90 s of reperfusion PDH flux is essentially zero and recovers within 20 min in reversibly-injured myocardium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1029-1036
Number of pages8
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine
Volume60
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008

Keywords

  • Bicarbonate
  • Carbon-13
  • Hyperpolarization
  • Ischemia/reperfusion
  • Lactate
  • Pyruvate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Inhibition of carbohydrate oxidation during the first minute of reperfusion after brief ischemia: NMR detection of hyperpolarized <sup>13</sup>CO <sub>2</sub> and H<sup>13</sup>CO<sub>3</sub><sup>-</sup>'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this