Inhibition of killer-target cell interaction by monoclonal anti-H-2 antibodies

K. Fischer Lindahl, H. Lemke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The sites on target cells with which cytotoxic T lymphocytes interact were characterized using three different monoclonal BALB/c anti-CBA antibodies derived from plasma cell hybrids. The antibodies all reacted with H-2K(k) and appeared to recognize public specificities H-2.5, 11 and 25, respectively. Allogeneic killing directed at products of H-2K(k) was inhibited by all three antibodies, irrespective of the H-2 haplotype of the responder; cytotoxicity directed at products of another allele, H-2K(d), or of the H-2D region on the same target cell was not affected. The antibodies did not inhibit killer cells carrying H-2K(k). Cytotoxic reactions against minor histocompatibility antigens, including the male-specific antigen H-Y, were also blocked by all three monoclonal antibodies when restricted by H-2K(k), but not when restricted by H-2D on the same target cell. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes thus appear to interact with their target via the same, serologically defined H-2K(k) molecule which carries public specificities, whether they recognize it as an alloantigen or as self. This argues against the existence of separate H-2K-encoded molecules recognized by killer cells only and against H-2-specific modifications of minor histocompatibility antigens as the basis of H-2 restriction. One of the antibodies, 27R9, which reacted with H-2K(k) and H-2(r) and was thought to recognize specificity H-2.25, showed a weak cytotoxic reaction but bound with a high titer to H-2D(k), a reaction that has not previously been described. This antibody selectively and with a very high titer inhibited male-specific cytotoxicity restricted by H-2D(k), but did not significantly interfere with allogeneic killing against products of the H-2D(k) region nor apparently with H-2D(k)-restricted cytotoxicity specific for other minor antigens. The results suggest the existence of at least two different restriction elements controlled by the H-2D(k) region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-536
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume9
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1979

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Cell Communication
Minor Histocompatibility Antigens
Antibodies
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
H-Y Antigen
Isoantigens
Plasma Cells
Haplotypes
Alleles
Monoclonal Antibodies
anti-H-2 antibodies
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Inhibition of killer-target cell interaction by monoclonal anti-H-2 antibodies. / Fischer Lindahl, K.; Lemke, H.

In: European Journal of Immunology, Vol. 9, No. 7, 1979, p. 526-536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fischer Lindahl, K. ; Lemke, H. / Inhibition of killer-target cell interaction by monoclonal anti-H-2 antibodies. In: European Journal of Immunology. 1979 ; Vol. 9, No. 7. pp. 526-536.
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abstract = "The sites on target cells with which cytotoxic T lymphocytes interact were characterized using three different monoclonal BALB/c anti-CBA antibodies derived from plasma cell hybrids. The antibodies all reacted with H-2K(k) and appeared to recognize public specificities H-2.5, 11 and 25, respectively. Allogeneic killing directed at products of H-2K(k) was inhibited by all three antibodies, irrespective of the H-2 haplotype of the responder; cytotoxicity directed at products of another allele, H-2K(d), or of the H-2D region on the same target cell was not affected. The antibodies did not inhibit killer cells carrying H-2K(k). Cytotoxic reactions against minor histocompatibility antigens, including the male-specific antigen H-Y, were also blocked by all three monoclonal antibodies when restricted by H-2K(k), but not when restricted by H-2D on the same target cell. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes thus appear to interact with their target via the same, serologically defined H-2K(k) molecule which carries public specificities, whether they recognize it as an alloantigen or as self. This argues against the existence of separate H-2K-encoded molecules recognized by killer cells only and against H-2-specific modifications of minor histocompatibility antigens as the basis of H-2 restriction. One of the antibodies, 27R9, which reacted with H-2K(k) and H-2(r) and was thought to recognize specificity H-2.25, showed a weak cytotoxic reaction but bound with a high titer to H-2D(k), a reaction that has not previously been described. This antibody selectively and with a very high titer inhibited male-specific cytotoxicity restricted by H-2D(k), but did not significantly interfere with allogeneic killing against products of the H-2D(k) region nor apparently with H-2D(k)-restricted cytotoxicity specific for other minor antigens. The results suggest the existence of at least two different restriction elements controlled by the H-2D(k) region.",
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