Innate and adaptive immunity cooperate flexibly to maintain host-microbiota mutualism

Emma Slack, Siegfried Hapfelmeier, Bärbel Stecher, Yuliya Velykoredko, Maaike Stoel, Melissa A E Lawson, Markus B. Geuking, Bruce Beutler, Thomas F. Tedder, Wolf Dietrich Hardt, Premysl Bercik, Elena F. Verdu, Kathy D. McCoy, Andrew J. Macpherson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

321 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Commensal bacteria in the lower intestine of mammals are 10 times as numerous as the body's cells. We investigated the relative importance of different immune mechanisms in limiting the spread of the intestinal microbiota. Here, we reveal a flexible continuum between innate and adaptive immune function in containing commensal microbes. Mice deficient in critical innate immune functions such as Toll-like receptor signaling or oxidative burst production spontaneously produce high-titer serum antibodies against their commensal microbiota. These antibody responses are functionally essential to maintain host-commensal mutualism in vivo in the face of innate immune deficiency. Spontaneous hyper-activation of adaptive immunity against the intestinal microbiota, secondary to innate immune deficiency, may clarify the underlying mechanisms of inflammatory diseases where immune dysfunction is implicated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)617-620
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume325
Issue number5940
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 31 2009

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Symbiosis
Microbiota
Adaptive Immunity
Innate Immunity
Respiratory Burst
Toll-Like Receptors
Immune System Diseases
Intestines
Antibody Formation
Mammals
Bacteria
Antibodies
Serum
Gastrointestinal Microbiome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Slack, E., Hapfelmeier, S., Stecher, B., Velykoredko, Y., Stoel, M., Lawson, M. A. E., ... Macpherson, A. J. (2009). Innate and adaptive immunity cooperate flexibly to maintain host-microbiota mutualism. Science, 325(5940), 617-620. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1172747

Innate and adaptive immunity cooperate flexibly to maintain host-microbiota mutualism. / Slack, Emma; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Stecher, Bärbel; Velykoredko, Yuliya; Stoel, Maaike; Lawson, Melissa A E; Geuking, Markus B.; Beutler, Bruce; Tedder, Thomas F.; Hardt, Wolf Dietrich; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F.; McCoy, Kathy D.; Macpherson, Andrew J.

In: Science, Vol. 325, No. 5940, 31.07.2009, p. 617-620.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slack, E, Hapfelmeier, S, Stecher, B, Velykoredko, Y, Stoel, M, Lawson, MAE, Geuking, MB, Beutler, B, Tedder, TF, Hardt, WD, Bercik, P, Verdu, EF, McCoy, KD & Macpherson, AJ 2009, 'Innate and adaptive immunity cooperate flexibly to maintain host-microbiota mutualism', Science, vol. 325, no. 5940, pp. 617-620. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1172747
Slack E, Hapfelmeier S, Stecher B, Velykoredko Y, Stoel M, Lawson MAE et al. Innate and adaptive immunity cooperate flexibly to maintain host-microbiota mutualism. Science. 2009 Jul 31;325(5940):617-620. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1172747
Slack, Emma ; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried ; Stecher, Bärbel ; Velykoredko, Yuliya ; Stoel, Maaike ; Lawson, Melissa A E ; Geuking, Markus B. ; Beutler, Bruce ; Tedder, Thomas F. ; Hardt, Wolf Dietrich ; Bercik, Premysl ; Verdu, Elena F. ; McCoy, Kathy D. ; Macpherson, Andrew J. / Innate and adaptive immunity cooperate flexibly to maintain host-microbiota mutualism. In: Science. 2009 ; Vol. 325, No. 5940. pp. 617-620.
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