Insomnia in patients with depression

A STAR*D report

Prabha Sunderajan, Bradley N. Gaynes, Stephen R. Wisniewski, Sachiko Miyahara, Maurizio Fava, Felicia Akingbala, Joanne DeVeaugh-Geiss, John Rush, Madhukar H. Trivedi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Insomnia symptoms, which are common in depression, have a significant impact on function and quality of life. However, little is known about the prevalence and associated features of insomnia symptoms in representative treatment-seeking patients with depression.Methods: Data from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial were analyzed. STAR*D recruited 3,743 adult outpatients diagnosed with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder (MDD) from primary (n=18) and psychiatric care (n=23) clinics across the United States. Baseline sociodemographic and clinical features were compared between those with insomnia symptoms (84.7%) and those without (15.3%). Results: The most common presentation was the simultaneous presence of sleep onset, mid-nocturnal, and early morning insomnia symptoms (27.1%). Of these three types of insomnia symptoms, mid-nocturnal insomnia symptoms were the most commonly found alone (13.5%) and in combination with one or more other types (82.3%). Insomnia symptoms were associated with several indicators of a more severe depressive illness. Only a small proportion of participants with insomnia symptoms were receiving treatment for sleep disturbances at study initiation, and the vast majority of those receiving treatment still reported having insomnia symptoms. Conclusion: In outpatients who seek treatment for nonpsychotic MDD in typical clinical settings, insomnia symptoms are very common, undertreated, and indicative of a more severe depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-404
Number of pages11
JournalCNS Spectrums
Volume15
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2010

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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Depression
Therapeutics
Major Depressive Disorder
Sleep
Outpatients
Psychiatry
Quality of Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Sunderajan, P., Gaynes, B. N., Wisniewski, S. R., Miyahara, S., Fava, M., Akingbala, F., ... Trivedi, M. H. (2010). Insomnia in patients with depression: A STAR*D report. CNS Spectrums, 15(6), 394-404.

Insomnia in patients with depression : A STAR*D report. / Sunderajan, Prabha; Gaynes, Bradley N.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Miyahara, Sachiko; Fava, Maurizio; Akingbala, Felicia; DeVeaugh-Geiss, Joanne; Rush, John; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

In: CNS Spectrums, Vol. 15, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 394-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sunderajan, P, Gaynes, BN, Wisniewski, SR, Miyahara, S, Fava, M, Akingbala, F, DeVeaugh-Geiss, J, Rush, J & Trivedi, MH 2010, 'Insomnia in patients with depression: A STAR*D report', CNS Spectrums, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 394-404.
Sunderajan P, Gaynes BN, Wisniewski SR, Miyahara S, Fava M, Akingbala F et al. Insomnia in patients with depression: A STAR*D report. CNS Spectrums. 2010 Jun;15(6):394-404.
Sunderajan, Prabha ; Gaynes, Bradley N. ; Wisniewski, Stephen R. ; Miyahara, Sachiko ; Fava, Maurizio ; Akingbala, Felicia ; DeVeaugh-Geiss, Joanne ; Rush, John ; Trivedi, Madhukar H. / Insomnia in patients with depression : A STAR*D report. In: CNS Spectrums. 2010 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 394-404.
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