Intensive care and emergency medicine: Progress over the past 25 years

Jean Louis Vincent, Mitchell P. Fink, John J. Marini, Michael R. Pinsky, William J. Sibbald, Mervyn Singer, Peter M. Suter, Deborah Cook, Paul E. Pepe, Timothy Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the last quarter of a century, intensive care medicine has developed into an established hospital specially with its own unique identity and characteristics. Significant advances have occurred, mostly in a succession of small steps rather than any dramatic leap, with many being linked to advances in health care across other disciplines. In addition, many changes have resulted from the scientific identification of the detrimental effects of certain traditional practices once thought to be therapeutic. Here, in an attempt to learn from the past and offer guidance for future progress, we detail some of the key changes in various aspects of intensive care medicine including respiratory, cardiovascular, metabolic, and nutritional care, as well as sepsis, polytrauma, organization, and management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1061-1067
Number of pages7
JournalChest
Volume129
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Fingerprint

Emergency Medicine
Critical Care
Pulmonary Medicine
Multiple Trauma
Sepsis
Medicine
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • ARDS
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Cardiovascular care
  • Critical care
  • Intensive care
  • invasive monitoring
  • Mechanical ventilation
  • Multiorgan failure
  • Polytrauma
  • Sepsis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Vincent, J. L., Fink, M. P., Marini, J. J., Pinsky, M. R., Sibbald, W. J., Singer, M., ... Evans, T. (2006). Intensive care and emergency medicine: Progress over the past 25 years. Chest, 129(4), 1061-1067. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.129.4.1061

Intensive care and emergency medicine : Progress over the past 25 years. / Vincent, Jean Louis; Fink, Mitchell P.; Marini, John J.; Pinsky, Michael R.; Sibbald, William J.; Singer, Mervyn; Suter, Peter M.; Cook, Deborah; Pepe, Paul E.; Evans, Timothy.

In: Chest, Vol. 129, No. 4, 04.2006, p. 1061-1067.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vincent, JL, Fink, MP, Marini, JJ, Pinsky, MR, Sibbald, WJ, Singer, M, Suter, PM, Cook, D, Pepe, PE & Evans, T 2006, 'Intensive care and emergency medicine: Progress over the past 25 years', Chest, vol. 129, no. 4, pp. 1061-1067. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.129.4.1061
Vincent JL, Fink MP, Marini JJ, Pinsky MR, Sibbald WJ, Singer M et al. Intensive care and emergency medicine: Progress over the past 25 years. Chest. 2006 Apr;129(4):1061-1067. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.129.4.1061
Vincent, Jean Louis ; Fink, Mitchell P. ; Marini, John J. ; Pinsky, Michael R. ; Sibbald, William J. ; Singer, Mervyn ; Suter, Peter M. ; Cook, Deborah ; Pepe, Paul E. ; Evans, Timothy. / Intensive care and emergency medicine : Progress over the past 25 years. In: Chest. 2006 ; Vol. 129, No. 4. pp. 1061-1067.
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