Inter-kingdom signalling: Communication between bacteria and their hosts

David T. Hughes, Vanessa Sperandio

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

408 Scopus citations

Abstract

Microorganisms and their hosts communicate with each other through an array of hormonal signals. This cross-kingdom cell-to-cell signalling involves small molecules, such as hormones that are produced by eukaryotes and hormone-like chemicals that are produced by bacteria. Cell-to-cell signalling between bacteria, usually referred to as quorum sensing, was initially described as a means by which bacteria achieve signalling in microbial communities to coordinate gene expression within a population. Recent evidence shows, however, that quorum-sensing signalling is not restricted to bacterial cell-to-cell communication, but also allows communication between microorganisms and their hosts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-120
Number of pages10
JournalNature Reviews Microbiology
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases

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