Interactions between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria in the gut

Andreas J. Baümler, Vanessa Sperandio

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

237 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The microbiome has an important role in human health. Changes in the microbiota can confer resistance to or promote infection by pathogenic bacteria. Antibiotics have a profound impact on the microbiota that alters the nutritional landscape of the gut and can lead to the expansion of pathogenic populations. Pathogenic bacteria exploit microbiota-derived sources of carbon and nitrogen as nutrients and regulatory signals to promote their own growth and virulence. By eliciting inflammation, these bacteria alter the intestinal environment and use unique systems for respiration and metal acquisition to drive their expansion. Unravelling the interactions between the microbiota, the host and pathogenic bacteria will produce strategies for manipulating the microbiota against infectious diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-93
Number of pages9
JournalNature
Volume535
Issue number7610
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 6 2016

Fingerprint

Microbiota
Bacteria
Communicable Diseases
Virulence
Respiration
Nitrogen
Carbon
Metals
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Inflammation
Food
Health
Growth
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • General

Cite this

Interactions between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria in the gut. / Baümler, Andreas J.; Sperandio, Vanessa.

In: Nature, Vol. 535, No. 7610, 06.07.2016, p. 85-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Baümler, Andreas J. ; Sperandio, Vanessa. / Interactions between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria in the gut. In: Nature. 2016 ; Vol. 535, No. 7610. pp. 85-93.
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