Interference by huntingtin and atrophin-1 with CBP-mediated transcription leading to cellular toxicity

Jr Nucifora F.C., M. Sasaki, M. F. Peters, H. Huang, J. K. Cooper, M. Yamada, H. Takahashi, S. Tsuji, J. Troncoso, V. L. Dawson, T. M. Dawson, C. A. Ross

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Abstract

Expanded polyglutamine repeats have been proposed to cause neuronal degeneration in Huntington's disease (HD) and related disorders, through abnormal interactions with other proteins containing short polyglutamine tracts such as the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein, CBP. We found that CBP was depleted from its normal nuclear location and was present in polyglutamine aggregates in HD cell culture models, HD transgenic mice, and human HD postmortem brain. Expanded polyglutamine repeats specifically interfere with CBP-activated gene transcription, and overexpression of CBP rescued polyglutamine-induced neuronal toxicity. Thus, polyglutamine-mediated interference with CBP-regulated gene transcription may constitute a genetic gain of function, underlying the pathogenesis of polyglutamine disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2423-2428
Number of pages6
JournalScience
Volume291
Issue number5512
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 23 2001

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Huntington Disease
CREB-Binding Protein
atrophin-1
polyglutamine
Transgenic Mice
Genes
Cell Culture Techniques
Brain
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Nucifora F.C., J., Sasaki, M., Peters, M. F., Huang, H., Cooper, J. K., Yamada, M., ... Ross, C. A. (2001). Interference by huntingtin and atrophin-1 with CBP-mediated transcription leading to cellular toxicity. Science, 291(5512), 2423-2428. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1056784

Interference by huntingtin and atrophin-1 with CBP-mediated transcription leading to cellular toxicity. / Nucifora F.C., Jr; Sasaki, M.; Peters, M. F.; Huang, H.; Cooper, J. K.; Yamada, M.; Takahashi, H.; Tsuji, S.; Troncoso, J.; Dawson, V. L.; Dawson, T. M.; Ross, C. A.

In: Science, Vol. 291, No. 5512, 23.03.2001, p. 2423-2428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nucifora F.C., J, Sasaki, M, Peters, MF, Huang, H, Cooper, JK, Yamada, M, Takahashi, H, Tsuji, S, Troncoso, J, Dawson, VL, Dawson, TM & Ross, CA 2001, 'Interference by huntingtin and atrophin-1 with CBP-mediated transcription leading to cellular toxicity', Science, vol. 291, no. 5512, pp. 2423-2428. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1056784
Nucifora F.C. J, Sasaki M, Peters MF, Huang H, Cooper JK, Yamada M et al. Interference by huntingtin and atrophin-1 with CBP-mediated transcription leading to cellular toxicity. Science. 2001 Mar 23;291(5512):2423-2428. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1056784
Nucifora F.C., Jr ; Sasaki, M. ; Peters, M. F. ; Huang, H. ; Cooper, J. K. ; Yamada, M. ; Takahashi, H. ; Tsuji, S. ; Troncoso, J. ; Dawson, V. L. ; Dawson, T. M. ; Ross, C. A. / Interference by huntingtin and atrophin-1 with CBP-mediated transcription leading to cellular toxicity. In: Science. 2001 ; Vol. 291, No. 5512. pp. 2423-2428.
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