Intracisternal administration of transforming growth factor-β evokes fever through the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in brain endothelial cells

Shigenobu Matsumura, Tetsuro Shibakusa, Teppei Fujikawa, Hiroyuki Yamada, Kiyoshi Matsumura, Kazuo Inoue, Tohru Fushiki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a pleiotropic cytokine, regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and plays a key role in development and tissue homeostasis. TGF-β functions as an anti-inflammatory cytokine because it suppresses microglia and B-lymphocyte functions, as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines. However, we previously demonstrated that the intracisternal administration of TGF-β induces fever like that produced by proinflammatory cytokines. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of TGF-β-induced fever. The intracisternal administration of TGF-β increased body temperature in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-selective inhibitor significantly suppressed TGF-β-induced fever. COX-2 is known as one of the rate-limiting enzymes of the PGE2 synthesis pathway, suggesting that fever induced by TGF-β is COX-2 and PGE2 dependent. TGF-β increased PGE2 levels in cerebrospinal fluid and increased the expression of COX-2 in the brain. Double immunostaining of COX-2 and von Willebrand factor (vWF, an endothelial cell marker) revealed that COX-2-expressing cells were mainly endothelial cells. Although not all COX-2-immunoreactive cells express TGF-β receptor, some COX-2-immunoreactive cells express activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ALK-1, an endothelial cell-specific TGF-β receptor), suggesting that TGF-β directly or indirectly acts on endothelial cells to induce COX-2 expression. These findings suggest a novel function of TGF-β as a proinflammatory cytokine in the central nervous system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume294
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

Fingerprint

Transforming Growth Factors
Cyclooxygenase 2
Fever
Endothelial Cells
Brain
Cytokines
Dinoprostone
Growth Factor Receptors
Activin Receptors
Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors
von Willebrand Factor
Microglia
Body Temperature
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Cell Differentiation
Homeostasis
B-Lymphocytes
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Central Nervous System
Cell Proliferation

Keywords

  • Blood vessel
  • Body temperature
  • Central nervous system
  • Proinflammatory cytokine
  • Prostaglandin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Intracisternal administration of transforming growth factor-β evokes fever through the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in brain endothelial cells. / Matsumura, Shigenobu; Shibakusa, Tetsuro; Fujikawa, Teppei; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 294, No. 1, 01.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsumura, Shigenobu ; Shibakusa, Tetsuro ; Fujikawa, Teppei ; Yamada, Hiroyuki ; Matsumura, Kiyoshi ; Inoue, Kazuo ; Fushiki, Tohru. / Intracisternal administration of transforming growth factor-β evokes fever through the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in brain endothelial cells. In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 2008 ; Vol. 294, No. 1.
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