Intrapartum asphyxia in pregnancies complicated by intra-amniotic infection

M. C. Maberry, S. M. Ramin, L. C. Gilstrap, K. J. Leveno, J. S. Dax

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intra-amniotic infection has been reported to be associated with intrapartum asphyxia; however, the criteria used to define asphyxia have been imprecise. In the present study of 123 women with intra-amniotic infection and 6,769 women without infection, the mean umbilical artery pH was 7.28 in both groups. The frequency of acidemia (umbilical artery pH less than 7.20) was not significantly different between the infection group and controls (15 versus 10%; P = .12). Likewise, there was no significant difference between the groups when a lower umbilical artery pH value (less than 7.15) was used to define acidemia. None of the infants from infected mothers had metabolic acidemia with a pH of less than 7.15 and none had a pH of less than 7.00. Significantly more (P < 0.05) infants in the infected group did have low 1-minute (20 versus 5%) and 5-minute (3 versus 1%) Apgar scores of 6 or less, criteria often used to define asphyxia. However, none of the newborns from the infected group had recently proposed criteria for the diagnosis of birth asphyxia (ie, leading to neurologic impairment) such as metabolic acidemia, seizures in the immediate newborn period, and low Apgar scores (3 or less). Birth asphyxia is rarely associated with intra-amniotic infection, and in the absence of other signs of fetal jeopardy such as an ominous fetal heart rate pattern, an immediate cesarean to prevent asphyxia does not appear justified once the diagnosis of chorioamnionitis is made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-354
Number of pages4
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume76
Issue number3 I
StatePublished - 1990

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Asphyxia
Pregnancy
Umbilical Arteries
Infection
Apgar Score
Parturition
Newborn Infant
Chorioamnionitis
Fetal Heart Rate
Infection Control
Nervous System
Seizures
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Maberry, M. C., Ramin, S. M., Gilstrap, L. C., Leveno, K. J., & Dax, J. S. (1990). Intrapartum asphyxia in pregnancies complicated by intra-amniotic infection. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 76(3 I), 351-354.

Intrapartum asphyxia in pregnancies complicated by intra-amniotic infection. / Maberry, M. C.; Ramin, S. M.; Gilstrap, L. C.; Leveno, K. J.; Dax, J. S.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 76, No. 3 I, 1990, p. 351-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maberry, MC, Ramin, SM, Gilstrap, LC, Leveno, KJ & Dax, JS 1990, 'Intrapartum asphyxia in pregnancies complicated by intra-amniotic infection', Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 76, no. 3 I, pp. 351-354.
Maberry, M. C. ; Ramin, S. M. ; Gilstrap, L. C. ; Leveno, K. J. ; Dax, J. S. / Intrapartum asphyxia in pregnancies complicated by intra-amniotic infection. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1990 ; Vol. 76, No. 3 I. pp. 351-354.
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